tentorium


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Related to tentorium: tentorial notch

tentorium

 [ten-tor´e-um] (L.)
an anatomical part resembling a tent or covering. adj., adj tento´rial.
tentorium cerebel´li the process of the dura mater supporting the occipital lobes and covering the cerebellum.

ten·to·ri·um

, pl.

ten·to·ri·a

(ten-tō'rē-ŭm, -rē-ă), [TA]
A membranous cover or horizontal partition.
[L. tent, fr. tendo, to stretch]

tentorium

/ten·to·ri·um/ (ten-tor´e-um) pl. tento´ria   [L.] an anatomical part resembling a tent or covering.tento´rial
tentorium cerebel´li , tentorium of cerebellum the process of the dura mater supporting the occipital lobes and covering the cerebellum.

tentorium

[tentôr′ē·əm] pl. tentoria
Etymology: L, tent
any part of the body that resembles a tent, such as the tentorium of the hypophysis that covers the hypophyseal fossa.

ten·to·ri·um

, pl. tentoria (ten-tōr'ē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
A membranous cover or horizontal partition.
[L. tent, fr. tendo, to stretch]

tentorium

  1. a fold of DURA MATER in the brain separating the OPTIC LOBES from the CEREBELLUM.
  2. the chitinous support of the brain in insects.

tentorium

pl. tentoria [L.] a part resembling a tent or covering.

tentorium cerebelli
the sheet of dura mater separating the cerebrum from the cerebellum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tentorium Company produces food products based on natural components of bee products.
Physiologic calcifications of the dura (Figure 3) are also very common in older age groups and are usually located in the falx or the tentorium.
The tentorium and position of the torcular Herophili are elevated; i.
25) Relative fixation of the cerebellum by the tentorium, with repetitive pivoting at the incisura, may cause distortion in the brainstem at the floor of the fourth ventricle with neuraxis damage during these internal brain movements.
Tentorium with the pleurostoma and its anterior and posterior pleurostomal processes sclerotized and differentiated.
Intracranial air was seen in the perimesencephalic cistern adjacent to the tentorium (figure 3).
The cerebellum is located in the posterior fossa and is separated from the cerebrum by the tentorium cerebelli.
On MRI, it was seen to extend into the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae producing thickening of the right lateral tentorium and edema of the right temporal lobe.
Traumatic aneurysms (approximately 1% of intracranial aneurysms) are often distal and most often result from penetrating trauma, adjacent fractures, or impact of the vessel with the falx cerebri or tentorium cerebelli (Figure 3).
We find the angle formed by the posterior edge of the sigmoid sinus and tentorium cerebelli and move 1 cm toward the IXth, Xth, and XIth cranial nerves from the apex of this angle.
The medial aspect of the temporal lobe is forced downward over the tentorium, compressing the neighboring oculomotor nerve and resulting in ipsilateral pupillary dilatation, which is often followed by oculomotor ophthalmoplegia.