tendency

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tendency

 [ten´den-se]
an inclination or likelihood; a predisposition toward an action, behavior, or thought process.
suicidal t's see suicide.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a new study titled "Machine learning of neural representations of suicide and emotion concepts identifies suicidal youth" by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, artificial intelligence models may succeed where psychologists don't in detect such tendencies.
Rubin is a master at studying human behavior, looking for ways that we can leverage our natural tendencies to become our best selves.
The feeling component is considered a reflection of the other components (appraisal, action tendencies, physiology, and/or behavior) in consciousness (dc Rivera 1977; Scherer 2005; Sonnemans and Frijda 1994).
The control of our natural tendencies requires self-dominance; it calls for us to be masters of ourselves.
In this situation--as shown by the results in this study--PLWAs become a group vulnerable to being the target of aggressive tendencies of HCWs because of their health condition and the stress associated with caring for them.
As well as being such an intelligent woman, I would say she had psychopathic tendencies.
Cluster analysis revealed three distinct cohorts: dancers with perfectionistic tendencies (40.
Many children who display ADD/ADHD tendencies also display behaviors which cause problems in a classroom setting.
tendencies of their projections for the growth in real GDP moving up to 3.
Overall, the existence of consumer ethnocentric tendencies and its negative influence on foreign products purchase have been confirmed (Puzakova et al.
The Turkish Central bank made public the results of the Business Tendency Survey conducted with 1,641 companies to find out indicators that reflect the short-term tendencies in the manufacturing industry.
Boyarin questions Yoder's tendency to assimilate Judaism to his diasporic account of 'right' Christianity and wonders about the difference therefore between Yoder's account of Christian identity and the rather imperialist tendencies of the religious right.