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Related to tenancy in common: Joint tenancy, tenancy by the entirety

tic

 [tik] (Fr.)
an involuntary, compulsive, rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movement or vocalization, experienced as irresistible although it can be suppressed for some length of time; occurrence is increased by stress and reduced during sleep or engrossing activities. Tics may be of psychogenic or neurogenic origin and are subclassified as either simple, such as eye blinking, shoulder shrugging, coughing, grunting, snorting, or barking; or complex, such as facial gestures, grooming motions, coprolalia (obscene language), echolalia (repeating the most recently heard word or sound), or echokinesis (imitation of another's movements).
tic douloureux a painful disorder of the trigeminal nerve, characterized by severe pain in the face and forehead on the affected side, extending to the midline of the face and head, triggered by stimuli such as cold drafts, chewing, drinking cold liquids, brushing the hair, or washing the face. Called also trigeminal neuralgia.

Treatment. Medical treatment is usually preferred, since surgical correction results in complete loss of sensation in the areas served by the nerve. The drugs employed include trichloroethylene administered by inhalation, niacin, potassium chloride, diethazine, and most recently carbamazepine. When surgery is resorted to, the patient must be watched for signs of corneal infection, which frequently occurs, usually because of loss of the corneal reflex, which normally provides a warning when foreign material or other injurious agents enter the eye. Postoperative instructions must be given so that the patient can take necessary measures for the protection of the eye after discharge from the hospital.
facial tic spasm of the facial muscles.

tic

(tik), Do not confuse this word with tick.
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, for example, clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking; especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm.
[Fr.]

tic

(tik) [Fr.] an involuntary, compulsive, rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movement or vocalization, experienced as irresistible although it can be suppressed for some length of time.
tic douloureux  (doo-loo-rdbobr´) trigeminal neuralgia.
facial tic  see under spasm.
habit tic  any tic that is psychogenic in origin.

tic

(tĭk)
n.
1. A repetitive, rapid, sudden muscular movement or vocalization, usually experienced as involuntary or semivoluntary.
2. A quirk or habit of behavior or language: common phrases that have become verbal tics.
intr.v. ticced, ticcing, tics
To have a tic; produce tics: factors that affect the frequency of ticcing.

tic

A sudden, repetitive, stereotyped, nonrhythmic movement—motor tic—or sound—phonic tic—involving discrete muscle groups, which may be invisible to the observer—e.g., abdominal tensing
Common tics Eye blinking, throat clearing
DiffDx Chorea, dystonia, myoclonus, autism and stereotypic movement disorder, compulsive movements of OCD and seizure activity

tic

Habit spasm A complex of multiple abrupt, coordinated involuntary and/or compulsive spasms, including eye blinking, facial gestures, vocalizations, shoulder shrugging, etc which, when controlled, may be followed by more intense and frequent 'rebound' contractions; tics may be exacerbated by stress and ameliorated by psychotherapy. See Dystonic tic, Motor tic, Tourette syndrome, Transient tic disorder, Verbal tic, Vocal tic. Cf Jumping Frenchmen of Maine syndrome Medtalk A popular synonym for diverticulosis.

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods (e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking); especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm
Synonym(s): Brissaud disease, habit spasm.
[Fr.]

Tic

Brief and intermittent involuntary movement or sound.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

Brissaud,

Edouard, French physician, 1852-1909.
Brissaud disease - habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods. Synonym(s): tic
Brissaud infantilism - Synonym(s): infantile hypothyroidism
Brissaud reflex - tickling the sole causes a contraction of the tensor fasciae latae muscle, even when there is no responsive movement of the toes.
Brissaud-Marie syndrome - unilateral spasm of the tongue and lips, of hysterical nature.

tic

involuntary, repeated muscle spasm

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of some muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing.
[Fr.]

tic,

n an involuntary, purposeless movement of muscle, usually occurring under emotional stress. It is a survival in stereotyped form of a movement or muscle set once used voluntarily and purposefully.
tic douloureux,
n spontaneous trigeminal neuralgia associated with a “trigger zone” and causing spasmodic contraction of the facial muscles. See also neuralgia, trigeminal.

tic

a spasmodic twitching movement made involuntarily by muscles that are ordinarily under voluntary control. In dogs, the myoclonus associated with infection by distemper virus is sometimes called a tic or chorea.

Patient discussion about tic

Q. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. My brothers eczema is very vulnerable to allergens. In spite of steps taken to eliminate this we have not succeeded much. His medicines do not help him. They cannot cure this immune disorder. They have started showing some side effects. His fight for eczema tic itching starts again once he stops his medicines. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. If any diet can help then please guide?

A. Though food can also trigger eczema symptoms. Thus you must avoid cow`s milk, eggs, shellfish. Avoid dusty areas, pollution. His doctor would have told about the allergens to be avoided just follow them. You can also make him have raw food. It’s said that they help reduce on the return of the symptoms. Use anything as natural as possible, like soaps, clothing and anything which is unnatural. This will help for the eczematic impact to reduce.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OUi3KAUCog&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v6OUi3KAUCog_eczema_tips?q=eczema&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about tic
References in periodicals archive ?
The tenancy in common is, as Carol Rose has described, "commons on the inside, [private] on the outside.
There is also some evidence about the preferences of cottage owners who ultimately abandon a tenancy in common in favor of some other form of ownership.
Tenancy in common allows the spouses to structure ownership of the new home so as to maximize gain deferral from the sale of the two old residences.
Because lenders are accustomed to (and from a servicing perspective, often only equipped to) dealing with a single borrower, it is important that a tenancy in common loan involving multiple borrowers be streamlined.
The IRS did state, however, that the surviving spouse's continued payment of 100% of the mortgage costs and taxes associated with the property would result in a gift to the extent allocable to the one-half tenancy in common interest held by the child after the disclaimer.
While he is active in the formation of tenancy in common (TIC) arrangements, Napoli has been outspoken about some of the glaring shortcomings of the TIC partnership agreement--one that allows average investors to own portions of a commercial property.