telemedicine


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

telemedicine

 [tel″ĕ-med´ĭ-sin]
a branch of telehealth consisting of provision of consultant services by off-site health care professionals to those on the scene; diagnosis and treatment can be done at a great distance through methods such as the videoconference or rapid transmission of digital files.

telemedicine

/tele·med·i·cine/ (-med´ĭ-sin) the provision of consultant services by off-site physicians to health care professionals on the scene, as by means of closed-circuit television.

telemedicine

(tĕl′ĭ-mĕd′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
The use of telecommunications technology to provide, enhance, or expedite health care services, as by accessing offsite databases, linking clinics or physicians' offices to central hospitals, or transmitting x-rays or other diagnostic images for examination at another site.

tel′e·med′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

telemedicine

the use of telecommunication equipment and information technology to provide clinical care to individuals at distant sites and the transmission of medical and surgical information and images needed to provide that care.

telemedicine

Informatics
Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information (e.g., telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology) is transmitted for analysis by a physician, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. This includes the use of electronic media to communicate between patients and clinicians or between clinicians on more than one site.

Main types
Store and forward (e.g., email picture as an attachment to a dermatologist), synchronous (e.g., videoconferencing to discuss patient, X-ray or lab result).

Medspeak-UK
The use of interactive audiovisuals and data transfer to diagnose and treat disease, teach/educate and transfer medical information.

telemedicine

Informatics Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information–eg, telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology, is transmitted from a distance to a physician for analysis, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. See Telemetry.

tel·e·med·i·cine

(telĕ-medi-sin)
The practice of medicine over a distance where the patient and doctor interact remotely, usually using a computer and a computer-mounted camera.

telemedicine

Medical activity in which written, audible and visual communication between doctor and patient, or between medical personnel, is conducted at long range via a communication network such as the Internet or an intranet. This communication can include teleconferencing, teleconsultation, teleradiology, distance learning and the performing of surgical operations at a remote distance from the patient. Telemedicine broadens the scope of consultation and makes access to experts easier. It can effect considerable savings in medical costs. See also MEDICAL COMPUTING.

telemedicine,

n the use of two-way television communication by which two or more physicians can consult on a patient. The consulting physicians have access to the diagnostic information as well as the ability to view and question the patient directly before making a diagnosis or offering a professional opinion.

telemedicine

the provision of consultant services by off-site veterinarians to other veterinarians on the scene, as by means of closed-circuit television.
References in periodicals archive ?
The telemedicine features most valuable to health providers were clinical documentation, the ability to send documentation to /from the electronic medical record, and the ability to analyze consult data.
Parents are citing telemedicine because of convenience and that's true for other industries that have gone mobile," Dr.
In 1905, a Dutch physician, Wilhem Einthoven, performed an early form of telemedicine by transmitting electrocardiogram data from a distance, and in 1924, Hugo Gernsback invented a "fantasy" telemedicine tool with robotic fingers and a projected video to remotely examine patients.
Eagle offers telemedicine solutions in multiple specialties.
At least 18 states authorize Medicaid reimbursement for telemedicine services provided in schools, according to the American Telemedicine Association.
Reimbursement ranked as the top barrier to telemedicine.
Despite hundreds of millions of dollars invested in telemedicine companies like Teladoc, Doctor on Demand, MDLive, and SnapMD, telemedicine is merely the tip of the iceberg.
Evidence documenting and memorialized appropriate patient informed consent for the use of telemedicine must be obtained and maintained.
The Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA)'s proposed definition of telemedicine, 'the exchange of information on health care at a distance for the purpose of facilitating, improving and enhancing, clinical, educational and scientific health care and research, particularly to the under-serviced areas in the Republic of South Africa', (1) has deficiencies.
This new program is part of a wider telemedicine network being built in the Balkans based on the successful model of the Kosovo Telemedicine Program established in 2002.
An Obama administration memo said the grants will, "Trigger the creation of innovative new businesses, provide cost-effective connections in rural areas, increase productivity, improve public safety, and allow for the development of mobile telemedicine, telework, distance learning, and other new applications that will transform Americans' lives.

Full browser ?