telemedicine


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telemedicine

 [tel″ĕ-med´ĭ-sin]
a branch of telehealth consisting of provision of consultant services by off-site health care professionals to those on the scene; diagnosis and treatment can be done at a great distance through methods such as the videoconference or rapid transmission of digital files.

telemedicine

/tele·med·i·cine/ (-med´ĭ-sin) the provision of consultant services by off-site physicians to health care professionals on the scene, as by means of closed-circuit television.

telemedicine

(tĕl′ĭ-mĕd′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
The use of telecommunications technology to provide, enhance, or expedite health care services, as by accessing offsite databases, linking clinics or physicians' offices to central hospitals, or transmitting x-rays or other diagnostic images for examination at another site.

tel′e·med′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

telemedicine

the use of telecommunication equipment and information technology to provide clinical care to individuals at distant sites and the transmission of medical and surgical information and images needed to provide that care.

telemedicine

Informatics
Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information (e.g., telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology) is transmitted for analysis by a physician, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. This includes the use of electronic media to communicate between patients and clinicians or between clinicians on more than one site.

Main types
Store and forward (e.g., email picture as an attachment to a dermatologist), synchronous (e.g., videoconferencing to discuss patient, X-ray or lab result).

Medspeak-UK
The use of interactive audiovisuals and data transfer to diagnose and treat disease, teach/educate and transfer medical information.

telemedicine

Informatics Any form of medical practice in which diagnostic information–eg, telecytology, telemetry, telemicroscopy, telepathology, or teleradiology, is transmitted from a distance to a physician for analysis, who performs teleconsultation; telemedicine focuses on provider aspects of healthcare telecommunications, especially medical imaging. See Telemetry.

tel·e·med·i·cine

(telĕ-medi-sin)
The practice of medicine over a distance where the patient and doctor interact remotely, usually using a computer and a computer-mounted camera.

telemedicine

Medical activity in which written, audible and visual communication between doctor and patient, or between medical personnel, is conducted at long range via a communication network such as the Internet or an intranet. This communication can include teleconferencing, teleconsultation, teleradiology, distance learning and the performing of surgical operations at a remote distance from the patient. Telemedicine broadens the scope of consultation and makes access to experts easier. It can effect considerable savings in medical costs. See also MEDICAL COMPUTING.

telemedicine,

n the use of two-way television communication by which two or more physicians can consult on a patient. The consulting physicians have access to the diagnostic information as well as the ability to view and question the patient directly before making a diagnosis or offering a professional opinion.

telemedicine

the provision of consultant services by off-site veterinarians to other veterinarians on the scene, as by means of closed-circuit television.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other prominent vendors: Aerotel Medical Systems, Agfa-Gevaert, Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, AMD Global Telemedicine, American Well, Cardiocom, Cisco Systems, F.
The huge demand for telemedicine has already attracted some leading enterprises to invest in Chinese telemedicine market.
The issues of broadband access and financial risk pose stumbling blocks to telemedicine adoption, but they are recognized challenges already being addressed in some ways by the healthcare industry as a whole.
Traditionally, telemedicine has been used for medical consultation and surgical procedures in poorer, rural communities.
All the community-dwelling patients randomized to telemedicine completed all three telemedicine visits.
In fact, according to a 2003 white paper by the American Telemedicine Association, many SNFs and assisted living facilities have shown themselves to be consistently more open to innovation than smaller-scale home healthcare agencies.
Telemedicine providers and receivers need to carefully research licensure rules by state whenever an out-of-state physician provides consulting services.
In the following section, the introduction and integration of telemedicine into a medical informatics curriculum is discussed and a framework for the design of a course is being presented.
Though telemedicine is far from being the great equalizer in addressing the North's doctor shortage, Williams says it does provide a degree of health-care equity, offering access to specialists for people who live hours away from advanced medical care, and in some cases delivers even the most basic medical services to remote nursing stations.
Although telemedicine has been shown to be a cost-effective alternative to delivering health care, it still may not work for every facility.
Telemedicine has not been adequately tested for delivering care to persons with SCI, nor for persons with other disabilities.
And while some advocates say telemedicine can improve patient care, critics say that it erodes the quality of care, because a nurse's image on a screen can never replace the human touch.

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