technophobia

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technophobia

(tĕk′nə-fō′bē-ə)
n.
Fear of or aversion to technology, especially computers and high technology.

tech′no·phobe′ n.
tech′no·pho′bic (-fō′bĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a similar manner, Electric Dreams and You've Got Mail address the complexities of love, romance, and the need for pastoral pleasure, but they establish their settings in the computer age and thus also engage with the technophilia associated with science fiction.
However, it is also deeply imbued with the country's love affair with technology, to the point where the technophilia encourages serious strategic misassessment.
Technophilia and nature religion: the growth of a paradox.
We see backbreaking, primitive manual labour in dangerous, miserable conditions, stark refutation to the Panglossian technophilia of contemporary bourgeois ideology.
He has unbridled contempt for a great many contemporary things: psychoanalysis and the "delirious egotism" which it breeds in its patients (102); hyperbolic consumption and brand-goods fetishism; an unreflective technophilia, especially vis-a-vis the IT industry; the proliferation of the "systems/company man" syndrome; euthanasia; feminism; and on and on.
From Technophobia to Technophilia Conference takes place May 19-22, 2005.
This is a key question for architects engaged in hospital design in the UK, where a combination of technophilia and response to short-term clinical fashion has for decades resulted in too many hospitals resembling rambling horizontal oilrigs rather than places of peace and healing.
JARI NIEMI, "Theories of Technology: Between Technophobia and Technophilia.
Led by events and placed in front of an undertaking that is defined "transhumain," "inhumain," he moves from technophilia to technophobia.
Ellen Ullman, a former software engineer, is the author of Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents.
This middle-of-the-road approach is needed to avoid the extremities of technophilia and technophobia.
Some cultural commentators, noting the technophilia of young people and the technophobia of those a generation or two removed, have proposed that the current generation of young people knows more than their parents and grandparents and, in an astonishing turnaround from centuries of family relationships, have little use for their elders.