taxonomy


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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

/tax·on·o·my/ (tak-son´ah-me) the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.taxonom´ic
numerical taxonomy  a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.

taxonomy

[takson′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, taxis, arrangement, nomos, rule
a system for classifying organisms according to their natural relationships on the basis of such common factors as embryology, structure, or physiological chemistry. The system has seven main levels, or taxa, each more comprehensive than those below it: kingdom, phylum (or division), class, order, family, genus, and species. Humans are members of the species Homo sapiens, of the genus Homo, in the family Hominidae in the order Primates, in the class Mammalia, in the phylum Chordata, in the kingdom Animalia. taxonomic, adj.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.

taxonomy (ta·ksôˑ·n·mē),

n 1., any specialized method of classifying objects or events.
2., scientific system used to classify living organisms.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.

numerical taxonomy
a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on findings of cognitive science following the original publication, a later revision of the taxonomy changes the nomenclature and order of the cognitive processes in the original version.
com/2013/05/infographic-video-how-62-ipad-apps-amplify-blooms-digital-taxonomy-for-higher-ed/) has a video and infographics for the use of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy with Web 2.
The court decided it was a very unrestricted license, that Home Depot could do as it pleased with this taxonomy.
The reviewers had no way of knowing the future impact of the taxonomy, so reading the reviews within their historical context is an interesting study in the initial reaction to the work.
There is a risk involved in excluding one or more dimensions since the excluded dimension could be a part of the other dimensions and therefore the taxonomy will not be inclusive enough.
XBRL International is a worldwide consortium of 400 member organizations that oversees the development of the XBRL Specification and XBRL GL, the Journal Taxonomy, a standard based on the XBRL Specification that defines how the information inside a business system can be represented using XML.
The use of Bloom's Taxonomy enables students to synthesize and apply new knowledge and decision-making skills to improve health status and reduce risk-taking behaviors.
0 of its taxonomy management solution Verity Collaborative Classifier.
Worsnop (2003) argues that Bloom's Taxonomy is not a sequence, but a classification system ("A Taxonomy Is Not a Sequence," Education Week, 23[7], 36).
Yet, pivotal to the success of these technologies is a rather old technology--arguably defined by Aristotle and later refined by Linnaeus--called a taxonomy.
And to illustrate her case, in "Drawing Now: Eight Propositions," she has grouped good-looking work by twenty-six contemporary artists under eight rubrics, declaring a kind of taxonomy for our moment.