tarsal coalitions

tarsal coalitions

; tarsal fusion; peroneal spastic flat foot synchondrosis of two or more tarsal bones due to conjunction of two or more midfoot and/or rearfoot bones because of failure of development of the intervening joint/s; normally asymptomatic during early childhood; becomes symptomatic (and painful) after fibrous/cartilaginous synchondrosis undergoes ossification, with resultant loss of normal interosseous movement, fixed heel eversion, loss of height of medial longitudinal arch, adaptive painful peroneal muscle spasm with shortening of peroneal tendons (hence the name peroneal spastic flat foot); tarsal coalitions affect 1-4% of population; talocalcaneal, calcaneocuboid and calcaneonavicular coalitions are most common presentations
References in periodicals archive ?
Common pediatric foot problems can range from pediatric flat foot, toe walking, in-toeing, and flat or high arches to tarsal coalitions and extra bone growth.
We saw a dramatic difference in frequency of tarsal coalitions when we applied a prospective approach; 11.
The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and relative frequency, by location and morphologic subtype, of tarsal coalitions utilizing magnetic resonance (MR) criteria.
In the first part, we sought to determine the frequency in which two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists described tarsal coalitions.
Tarsal coalitions in typical locations are generally felt to be a developmental anomaly.
The radiographic and cross-sectional criteria for the diagnosis of the various types of tarsal coalitions have been previously described.
We cannot be sure how many of these tarsal coalitions were actually the cause of their symptomatology and whether subtle fibrous and cartilaginous coalitions tended to be less symptomatic than osseous coalitions.
Although not called "true" tarsal coalitions, the "coalition-like" appearance was seen in an additional group of cases (7.
These anatomic changes associated with tarsal coalitions are presumably due to the altered biomechanics that a relatively or completely immobile articulation would place upon the midfoot and hindfoot.
Tarsal coalitions appear to be much more common than previously described, likely because fibrous and cartilaginous coalitions are infrequently recognized by plain radiography.
Tarsal coalitions and peroneal spastic flatfoot: A review.
5,6) Calcaneonavicular coalition (Figure 4) is the most common of the tarsal coalitions.