target heart rate


Also found in: Acronyms.
Cardiology
(1) A specific age-based pulse rate to be maintained during aerobic exercise to ensure optimal cardiovascular function
(2) An exercise intensity that maintains the heart rate at 60% to 85% of the maximum
Sports medicine The optimal heart rate at which an athlete should perform a particular sport activity, determined by a formula that bases training intensity zones on heart rates as percentages of cardiac reserve

target heart rate

Cardiology A pre-determined pulse rate to target during aerobic exercise based on age when the cardiovascular system is functioning optimally.

tar·get heart rate

(tahr'gĕt hahrt rāt)
Heart rate experienced during exercise; varies depending on objective of person exercising; usually a range of 65-95% of age-predicted maximal heart rate or 50-85% of heart rate reserve.
See also: training-sensitive zone

target heart rate

heart rate (HR) range aspired to during aerobic training, with view to enhancing cardiovascular fitness. Always best set in relation to the individual's measured maximal heart rate (HRmax) or heart rate reserve (HRR), rather than general population figures. In exercise for health, 60-85% HRmax or 55-80% HRR may typically be prescribed.
References in periodicals archive ?
15) For the aforementioned reasons it may be more realistic to set the target heart rate lower for patients using beta blockers.
Innovative designs that offer motivational feedback such as metabolic rate, target heart rate, calorie expenditure, power output, etc.
You then step on to the mat and jog, walk or move for another 30 seconds to maintain your target heart rate before moving to the next piece of equipment.
To get the most out of it, gradually increase your exertion level until you've reached your target heart rate, which is between 50 and 75 percent of your maximum heart rate (your age subtracted from 220).
Are you working within your target heart rate zone?
We take our pulses, checking for target heart rate, while admiring our just completed handiwork.
In general, the target heart rate is 65 percent of the MHR for those beginning an exercise program, 75 percent of the MHR for regular exercisers, and 85 percent of the MHR for those in advanced regimens.
Specific suggestions are included on how to start an exercise program and how to determine target heart rate zones and exercise intensity.
If you don't want to go high tech you can use the "talk test' The theory is that if you are engaged in exercise; your body temperature is elevated; and you're sweating; but you can still carry on a conversation, you are at about 6070 percent of your target heart rate.
For example, a 40-year-old woman who is starting an exercise program with a resting heart rate of 72 beats per minute would calculate her target heart rate thus:
Pregnant exercisers who use "target heart rates" to gauge the strenuousness of aerobic exercise should use modified target heart rate zones that are slightly lower than the zones for nonpregnant exercisers, Larry A.