tarantula


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tarantula

 [tah-ran´tu-lah]
a large hairy venomous spider; although its bite is painful, it is seldom dangerous. See also spider bite.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tă-ran'chū-lă),
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; the bite, however, is usually no more harmful than a bee sting, and the creature is relatively inoffensive. See: tarantism.

tarantula

/ta·ran·tu·la/ (tah-ran´chu-lah) a venomous spider whose bite causes local inflammation and pain, usually not to a severe extent, including Eurypelma hentzii (American t.), Sericopelma communis (black t.) of Panama, and Lycosa tarentula (European wolf spider).

tarantula

(tə-răn′chə-lə)
n. pl. tarantu·las or tarantu·lae (-lē′)
1. Any of various large hairy spiders chiefly of the family Theraphosidae, capable of inflicting a bite that is painful but usually not dangerous to humans.
2. A large wolf spider (Lycosa tarentula) of southern Europe, once thought to cause tarantism.

tarantula

[təran′chələ]
a popular name for any of a number of species of large, hairy spiders. Although potentially poisonous, most are relatively harmless to humans. A bite by some species may produce an area of superficial skin destruction and may cause allergic reaction.
Entomology A large hairy spider, mostly of the family Theraphosidae. Their leg hair causes irritation and rashes; the bite of the Peruvian tarantula, Glyptocranium gasteracanthoides, is poisonous and may cause local ischaemia and gangrene, and evoke haematuria. See Arachnid injuries
Homeopathy A remedy prepared from tarantula parts, used for mental and physical hyperactivity, respiratory complaints, headaches, cardiovascular disease, anginal pain See Homeopathy
Vox populi Tarantulas can be kept as pets.

Tarantula

Lycosa tarantula, wolf spider Entomology A popular, much maligned and relatively harmless Grade B Movie prop. See Arachnid injuries.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tăr-an'chū-lă)
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; in fact, however, the bite is usually no more harmful than a bee sting.

tarantula

References in periodicals archive ?
When Reichling first went to Belize in 1994, he planned to study ecology and behavior of tarantulas.
Left to itself, a tarantula isn't the least interested in vertebrates as big as us.
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Our fears have been reinforced by fiction, such as the 1955 film Tarantula, in which a 100-foot-tall hairy spider rampages through an Arizona town until an air force pilot, played by Clint Eastwood, mounts a defense with napalm.
As soon as the tarantulas were installed, the thefts ceased.
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These tarantulas live in a warm and humid environment in the wild and need the same provided in captivity, to meet their needs and keep them healthy.
They didn't actually squash the real tarantula - called Long Legs - but a plastic one.
Hsiung and colleagues argue against dismissing tarantula blue as a useless side effect.
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His biggest tarantula is a mature male Goliath bird-eater that measures 10 inches long from front leg to back leg.