talipes


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Related to talipes: talipes calcaneus, talipes valgus, talipes equinovalgus, talipes varus

talipes

 [tal´ĭ-pēz]
a deformity in which the foot is twisted out of normal position; see also clubfoot and see illustration. It may have an abnormally high longitudinal arch (talipes cavus) or it may be in dorsiflexion (talipes calcaneus), in plantar flexion (talipes equinus), abducted and everted (talipes valgus or flatfoot), adducted and inverted (talipes varus), or various combinations of these (talipes calcaneovalgus, talipes calcaneovarus, talipes equinovalgus, or talipes equinovarus).



There are several theories as to the cause of clubfoot. A familial tendency or arrested growth during fetal life may contribute to its development, or it may be caused by a defect in the ovum. It sometimes accompanies meningomyelocele as a result of paralysis. In mild clubfoot there are slight changes in the structure of the foot; more severe cases involve orthopedic deformities of both the foot and leg. Although clubfoot is usually congenital, an occasional case in an older child may be caused by injury or poliomyelitis.

Treatment varies according to the severity of the deformity. Milder cases may be corrected with casts that are changed periodically, the foot being manipulated into position each time the cast is changed so that it gradually assumes normal position. A specially designed splint may also be used, made of two plates attached to shoes with a crossbar between the plates and special set screws so that the angulation of the foot can be changed as necessary. More severe deformities require surgery of the tendons and bones, followed by the application of a cast to maintain proper position of the joint.
Talipes.

tal·i·pes

(tal'i-pēz),
Any deformity of the foot involving the talus.
[L. talus, ankle, + pes, foot]

talipes

/tal·i·pes/ (tal´ĭ-pēz) a congenital deformity in which the foot is twisted out of shape or position; it may be in dorsiflexion (t. calca´neus), in plantar flexion (t. equi´nus), abducted and everted (t. val´gus or flatfoot), abducted and inverted (t. va´rus), or various combinations (t. calcaneoval´gus, t. calcaneova´rus, t. equinoval´gus, or t. equinova´rus) .
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Talipes.

talipes

(tăl′ə-pēz′)
n.

talipes

[tal′ipēz]
Etymology: L, talus, ankle, pes, foot
a deformity of the foot and ankle, usually congenital, in which the foot is twisted and relatively fixed in an abnormal position. Talipes refers to deformities that involve the foot and ankle, whereas pes refers only to deformities of the foot. Kinds of talipes include talipes calcaneovalgus, talipes calcaneovarus, and talipes equinovarus. See also clawfoot, flatfoot.

talipes

Latin, talipes = talus–ankle + pes–foot A general term for clubfoot–a congenital foot deformity involving the talus. See Clubfoot.

tal·i·pes

(tal'i-pēz)
Any deformity of the foot involving the talus.
[L. talus, ankle, + pes, foot]

talipes

Clubfoot. A congenital deformity affecting the shape or position of one or both feet. In talipes cavus, there is exaggeration of the curvature of the longitudinal arch. In talipes equinovarus the ankle is extended and the heel and sole turned inwards.

talipes

congenital foot deformity, about the talus
  • talipes calcaneovalgus congenital vertical orientation of longitudinal axes of talus and calcaneum secondary to soft-tissue deformity of lower leg and foot; characterized by marked ankle joint dorsiflexion, subtalar joint eversion, loss of concavity of medial longitudinal arch; the foot cannot be placed passively in a plantigrade position

  • talipes equinovarus significant congenital skeletomuscular deformity of lower limb and foot; absence of pronatory rotation at neck of talus causes the foot to retain the early embryological relationship to the lower limb (Figure 1); occurs ideopathically, but is also associated with significant congenital neurological dysfunction/dysplasias; characterized by heel inversion + very marked forefoot inversion, underdevelopment and contracture of lower-limb posterior musculature, ankle plantarflexion, near horizontal talar axis, marked inversion of subtalar and midtarsal joints, forefoot adduction, weight-bearing lateral rearfoot, talar head prominence at dorsolateral aspect of rearfoot, exaggerated concavity of medial longitudinal arch exaggerated, and inability to place the foot passively in plantigrade position; treatment aims to achieve a plantigrade foot, e.g. early-infancy strapping and soft-tissue stretching (a Denis Browne splint may be used to maintain correction gained by strapping/stretching therapy, once the child can walk); reduction of persistent soft-tissue contractures with injection of botulinum toxin into posterior-group muscles (+ below-knee cast); surgical options include Achilles tendon lengthening, or plantar fasciotomy; skeletal deformity/dysfunction is corrected by osteotomy (e.g. of calcaneum and metatarsals) and/or triple arthrodesis in order to achieve a plantigrade and functional foot

Figure 1: Uncorrected talipes equinovarus in a new-born infant. This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

talipes,

n a congenital deformity of the ankle and foot wherein the foot is twisted and fixed in an abnormal position.

talipes

References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of talipes equinovarus.
When nine-month-old Charlotte Stojkovic was born doctors noticed she had a severe case of talipes in her left foot, which meant it was turned the wrong way.
Little Mia, aged nine months, was born with Congenital Talipes Equinovarus, commonly known as club foot.
Mrs Smith, from Pallister Park, already suffers from Talipes - also known as club foot - and has to care for her 15-month-old son Nathan.
JOHN'S, NFLD, -- Fetal karyotyping may still be warranted when isolated talipes is found on ultrasound, Dr.
Wife Susan's own mobility is impaired by asthma and epilepsy, while daughter Hayley also struggles to negotiate the flights of stairs, having suffered from talipes (a rare club foot disorder) since birth.
A Congenital talipes is its medical name and it's a deformity of the ankle and foot which means the ankle is twisted and the soles of the feet face each other.
Associated non-skeletal anomalies tend to correspond to the level of the vertebral defects and include bilobed bladder, hydronephrosis, hernia, anal and urethral atresia, and talipes equinovarus.
In this study, the strength of the association was the same for talipes equinovarus as for valgus deformities.
Club foot, also called talipes, is a condition where a baby is born with one or both feet twisted out of shape.
The two-year-old was born with severe talipes - also known as club foot - which is when the foot appears rotated internally at the ankle.
Talin Tremlett, pictured right, was born with severe talipes - also known as club foot - which is when the foot appears rotated internally at the ankle.