tacrine


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Related to tacrine: Rivastigmine, Galantamine, Metrifonate

tacrine

 [tak´rēn]
a cholinesterase inhibitor used to improve cognitive performance in treatment of dementia of the Alzheimer type; used as the hydrochloride salt.

tac·rine

(tak'rēn),
An anticholinesterase agent with nonspecific CNS stimulatory effects; used in early stages of Alzheimer disease.

tacrine

/tac·rine/ (tak´rēn) a cholinesterase inhibitor used to improve cognitive performance in dementia of the Alzheimer type; used as the hydrochloride salt.

tacrine

(tăk′rēn, -rĭn)
n.
A drug, C13H14N2, used in its hydrochloride form to treat memory loss and other cognitive deficits in people with Alzheimer's disease.

tacrine

Cognex® Neurology An aminoacridine-type cholinesterase inhibitor reported to improve–slightly–the cognitive status of Pts with Alzheimer's disease Adverse effects Hepatotoxicity

tac·rine

(tak'rēn)
An anticholinesterase agent with nonspecific stimulatory effects on the central nervous system.

tacrine

An acetylcholinase inhibitor drug that has been found to be of value in 30–40 per cent of people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. The drug has been approved for use in the USA but, because of its side effects, not in the UK. Newer acetylcholinase inhibitors are being developed.

Tacrine

A drug commonly prescribed for Alzheimer's disease that provides temporary improvement in cognitive functions for some patients with mild-to-moderate forms of the disease.
Mentioned in: Dementia

tac·rine

(tak'rēn)
An anticholinesterase agent with nonspecific central nervous system stimulatory effects; used in early stages of Alzheimer disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tacrine (tetrahydroaminoacridine; THA) and lecithin in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type: a multicentre trial.
That same year, Tacrine (Cognex) was approved by the FDA.
The economic impact of tacrine in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
Cholinesterase inhibitors--donepezil, tacrine, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine--are used almost exclusively to treat dementia.
Huperzine A (HupA), a cholinesterase inhibitor naturally derived from the Chinese herb Lycopodium serratum (or Huperzia serrata), has better penetration through the blood-brain barrier, higher oral bioavailability and longer duration of AChE inhibitory action than tacrine, donepezil, and rivastigmine.
Table 1 FDA-approved treatments for Alzheimer's disease Drug Maximum Mechanism Indication Common side daily of action effects/comments dose Tacrine 160 ChEl Mild to Nausea, vomiting, mg/d moderate loss of appetite, AD diarrhea.
This compound is considered to be more effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to have fewer limitations than physostigmine and tacrine (Gordon et al.
Effects of four non-cholinergic cognitive enhancers in comparison with tacrine and galanthamine on scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats.
Aricept, Tacrine, Gallantamine, and Memantine), but these must be recommended without raising hopes too high.
Examples of cognitive enhancement cholinergic drugs include the Alzheimer's drugs Galantamine, Donepezil, Rivastigmine, Tacrine and Meclofenoxate.
Changes in cytochrome oxidase activity following spatial working memory learning in rats treated with tacrine
Four cholinesterase inhibitor drugs are approved by the FDA and available in the United States: donepezil (Aricept[TM]), galantamine (Razadyne[TM]), rivastigmine (Exelon[TM]), and tacrine (Cognex[TM]) (Alzheimer's Association 2009c).