tabanid


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tabanid

 [tab´ah-nid]
a biting insect of the family Tabanidae, including the horseflies and deerflies.

tab·a·nid

(tab'ă-nid),
Common name for flies of the family Tabanidae.
[L. tabanus, gadfly]

tabanid

/tab·a·nid/ (tab´ah-nid) any gadfly of the family Tabanidae, including the horseflies and deerflies.

tabanid

(tə-bā′nĭd, -băn′ĭd)
n.
Any of various bloodsucking dipteran flies of the family Tabanidae, which includes the horseflies and deerflies.

ta·ba′nid adj.

tab·a·nid

(tab'ă-nid)
Common name for flies of the family Tabanidae.
[L. tabanus, gadfly]

tabanid

a fly of the family Tabanidae, including the genera Chrysops, Haematopota, Pangonia and Tabanus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Larval and pupal descriptions, habitats, and life histories are still undocumented for several tabanid species.
They found that striping is highly associated with several consecutive months of ideal conditions for tabanid reproduction.
Tabanid vectors of the arterial nematode, Elaeophora schneideri, in southwestern Montana.
Tabanid flies (Diptera: Tiabanidae), horseflies and deerflies, are frequent hosts.
No tabanid species (biting) flies were seen on any carcass, and the small number of carcasses and relatively large distances between some properties made mechanical transmission with ocular inoculation by nonbiting flies unlikely (4).
Twelve cultures showed only minimal serological relationships with the 20 known antisera to tabanid associated Spiroplasma (five of which are from Costa Rica).
Possibly, tabanid flies, which may feed on deer, are involved in perpetuating E tularensis on Martha's Vineyard as they are in the western United States (12).
SEROLOGICAL EVALUATION OF COSTA RICAN TABANID FLY SPIROPLASMA BACTERIA, Kimberly M.
1968 Extensive discussion and literature review of Tabanid spe- cies (horsefly) as potential vector; role in transmission remains inconclusive.
To catch multiple species of tabanids (commonly known as horseflies, B 52's, yellow flies, greenheads, and deer flies, etc.
This tactic is particularly widespread in flies, with hilltopping reported for tabanids (da Rosa, 2006), bombyliids (Dodson and Yeates, 1990; Yeates and Dodson, 1990), tachinids (Wood, 1987; Alcock and Kemp, 2006), pipunculids (skevington, 2001), cuterebrids (Catts, 1967; Alcock and Kemp, 2004), and syrphids (Chapman, 1954; Maier and Waldbauer, 1979; Wellington and Fitzpatrick, 1981; Gilbert, 1984; Waldbauer, 1990; Fleenor and Taber, 2009), among others (Skevington, 2008).