systemic circulation


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Related to systemic circulation: Coronary circulation

sys·tem·ic cir·cu·la·tion

the circulation of blood through the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the general system, from the left ventricle to the right atrium.
Synonym(s): greater circulation

systemic circulation

n.
The general circulation of the blood through the body, as opposed to the circulation of the blood from the heart to the lungs and back to the heart.

systemic circulation

Etymology: Gk, systema + L, circulare, to go around
the general blood circulation of the body, not including the lungs. Also called greater circulation.

systemic circulation

Cardiology The part of the circulatory system concerned with blood flow from the left ventricle of the heart to the entire body and back to the heart via the right atrium. Cf Pulmonary system.

sys·tem·ic cir·cu·la·tion

(sis-tem'ik sĭr'kyū-lā'shŭn)
The circulation of blood through the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the general system, from the left ventricle to the right atrium.
Enlarge picture
SYSTEMIC CIRCULATION

systemic circulation

The blood flow from the left ventricle through the aorta and all its arteries to the capillaries of the tissues and its return to the heart through veins and the venae cavae, which empty into the right atrium. See: illustration
See also: circulation

systemic circulation

that part of the circulatory system in vertebrates from the VENTRICLE(S) back to theAURICLE(S), and excluding the PULMONARY SYSTEM.

Systemic circulation

Through the body, as opposed to "pulmonary"—through the lungs.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

sys·tem·ic cir·cu·la·tion

(sis-tem'ik sĭr'kyū-lā'shŭn)
Circulation of blood through arteries, capillaries, and veins of the general system, from left ventricle to right atrium.

circulation

movement in a regular or circuitous course, returning to the point of origin, as the circulation of the blood through the heart and blood vessels. See also circulatory system.

antegrade circulation
circulation in the normal direction of flow.
artificial circulation
is maintained in cardiopulmonary arrest by cardiac compression.
collateral circulation
circulation carried on through secondary channels after obstruction of the principal channel supplying the part.
coronary circulation
that within the coronary vessels, which supply the muscle of the heart.
cutaneous circulation
cutaneous vessels are innervated by sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstrictor fibers; vasodilation is an important mechanism for losing heat after the body has been warmed.
enterohepatic circulation
the cycle in which bile salts and other substances excreted by the liver in the bile are absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and returned to the liver via the portal circulation.
extracorporeal circulation
circulation of blood outside the body, as through a hemodialyzer or an extracorporeal circulatory support unit.
fetal circulation
circulation of blood through the body of the fetus and to and from the placenta through the umbilical cord. See also fetal circulation.
hepatic circulation
includes the hepatic arterial blood supply and the supply from the portal vein; drainage is via the hepatic veins to the caudal vena cava.
lymph circulation
see lymph.
maternal circulation
the circulation of the dam during pregnancy, including especially that of the uterus.
micro-circulation
neonatal circulation
circulation in the newborn immediately after birth; the umbilical vessels contract forcing blood into the fetal veins; the foramen ovale closes, the ductus arteriosus narrows and eventually closes at day 1 to 2 after birth.
ocular circulation
consists of the uveal and retinal blood vessels supported by the aqueous humor and vitreous body.
placental circulation
consists of the umbilical arteries, the vessels of the placenta proper and the umbilical veins; approximates the fetal corporeal circulation in volume.
portal circulation
a general term denoting the circulation of blood through larger vessels from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and spleen through the portal vein to the liver.
pulmonary circulation
the flow of blood from the right ventricle through the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where carbon dioxide is exchanged for oxygen, and back through the pulmonary vein to the left atrium. See also pulmonary circulation.
splenic circulation
flow of blood through the splenic artery and arterioles to either the capillaries, e. g. white pulp, or the highly permeable sinuses of the red pulp. Splenic venous blood drains into the portal vein and passes through the liver before re-entering the general circulation.
systemic circulation
the flow of blood from the left ventricle through the aorta, carrying oxygen and nutrient material to all the tissues of the body, and returning through the superior and inferior venae cavae to the right atrium.
circulation time
the time required for blood to flow between two given points. It is determined by injecting a substance into a vein and then measuring the time required for it to reach a specific site.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the amount reaching the systemic circulation was not provided by the manufacturers for these three agents, a caution was placed on phenylephrine stating that systemic absorption, although rare, might cause alpha-adrenergic effects, such as a rise in blood pressure and reflex atropine-sensitive bradycardia.
However, while waiting for surgery it is important to balance the lung circulation and the systemic circulation.
The transdermal delivery route obviates this problem: The drug enters systemic circulation directly, so a therapeutic level is achieved in the brain at a dose that spares MAO-A receptors in the intestine, Dr.
Timolol is readily absorbed from the conjunctiva and nasal mucosa (by drainage through the lacrimal duct) into the systemic circulation, bypassing the liver, where the drug is normally metabolized> consequently, a high concentration of this nonselective [beta]-adrenergic blocking agent may reach the bronchopulmonary circulation.
Alternatively, the protein can be mobilized from nanospheres and rapidly transported to systemic circulation by the epithelial cells.
sup][2] showed that bevacizumab can escape from the vitreous into the systemic circulation and reduce systemic VEGF concentrations for weeks to months in ROP infants whereas Carneiro et al.
This indicates that NPs could have a two-fold impact on the intestine by first affecting SCFA production, then leading to systemic circulation of the NPs via an inhibited intestinal barrier," say the authors.
According to the company, transdermal therapeutics are absorbed through the skin directly into the systemic circulation, avoiding first-pass liver metabolism and potentially enabling lower dosage levels of active pharmaceutical ingredients and rapid and reliable absorption with high bioavailability.
HMO are immunomodulatory glycans in breast milk that are also present in the systemic circulation of pregnant women.
This involves first the regional lymph nodes (obturator and pelvic) to the retroperitoneum, then cysterna chyli, and finally the thoracic duct where the lymphatic system enters the systemic circulation by the left subclavian vein.
Different from the literature, we aimed to evaluate the preoperative hemodynamic parameters and whether or not the right or the left ventricles supporting the systemic circulation as a "dominant ventricle" pose a risk for postoperative arrhythmia.
Similarly, the systemic vascular resistance in the systemic circulation represents the afterload on the left ventricle.