syphilitic aortitis


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syph·i·lit·ic a·or·ti·tis

a common manifestation of tertiary syphilis, involving the thoracic aorta, where destruction of elastic tissue in the media results in dilation and aneurysm formation.

syphilitic aortitis

inflammation of the aorta occurring in tertiary syphilis. It is characterized by diffuse dilation with gray, wheal-like plaques containing calcium on the inside and scars and wrinkles on the outside of the aorta. The middle layer of the aortic wall is usually infiltrated with plasma cells and contains fragments of damaged elastic tissue and many newly formed blood vessels. There may be damage to the cardiac valves, narrowing of the mouths of the coronary arteries, and formation of thrombi. Cerebral embolism may result. Signs of syphilitic aortitis are substernal pain, dyspnea, bounding pulse, and high systolic blood pressure. Penicillin may slow the course of the disease, but it cannot reverse the structural damage to the vessels and the heart. Also called Döhle-Heller disease, luetic aortitis.

syphilitic aortitis

Infectious disease The most common systemic change of late syphilis, most prominent in the ascending aorta and transverse arch; the vasa vasorum is obliterated, vasa media is necrosed and fibrotic. See Syphilis.

Döhle,

(Doehle), Karl G.P., German histologist and pathologist, 1855-1928.
Döhle bodies - found in neutrophils of patients with infections, burns, trauma, pregnancy, or cancer. Synonym(s): Döhle inclusions; leukocyte inclusions
Döhle inclusions - Synonym(s): Döhle bodies
Döhle-Heller aortitis - a common manifestation of tertiary syphilis, involving the thoracic aorta, where destruction of elastic tissue in the media results in dilation and aneurysm formation. Synonym(s): syphilitic aortitis

syph·i·lit·ic a·or·ti·tis

(sif'i-litik ā'ōr-tītis)
Common manifestation of tertiary syphilis, involving thoracic aorta, where destruction of elastic tissue in media results in dilation and aneurysm formation.
References in periodicals archive ?
sup][14],[15] Three cases were syphilis with pulmonary involvement,[sup][16],[17],[18] one was syphilitic osteomyelitis,[sup][19] one was syphilitic aortitis,[sup][20] and one was syphilitic hepatitis.
In syphilitic aortitis, PET showed marked radiotracer enhancement along the ascending aortic wall or in the thoracoabdominal aorta with involvement of the brachiocephalic and left carotid arteries.
Three cases with syphilitic aortitis and one case with anal and rectal syphilis were incidentally diagnosed by PET.
The majority of the case reports found that a PET scan was useful for characterizing the disease extent, especially in generalized lymphadenopathy, syphilitic aortitis, and neurosyphilis with dementia,[sup][3],[7],[12],[14],[20],[22],[23],[24],[25],[28],[30],[32],[33],[38],[39] with the exception being cases in which the PET scan showed no pathological glucose uptake.
The findings of this systematic review implied that PET could identify syphilitic aortitis at an early asymptomatic stage.
Probable syphilitic aortitis documented by positron emission tomography.
Differential features of other large cell vasculitides Large cell vasculitis Differential features Kawasaki disease Fever, diffuse mucosal inflammation and dysmorphic skin rashes Cogan's syndrome Interstitial keratitis and acute onset of sensorineural hearing loss and several other neurological manifestations Syphilitic aortitis Skin, mucous membranes manifestations, Negative VDRL Rheumatoid arthritis Joint manifestations Ankylosing spondylitis Sacroilitis Retroperitoneal fibrosis Periaortic and aortic inflammation associated with retroperitoneal and mediastinal fibrosis Behcet's disease Genital and oral aphthous ulcers, uveitis Sarcoidosis Interstitial lung diseases