syntality

syn·tal·i·ty

(sin-tal'i-tē),
The consistent and predictable behavior of a social group.
[prob. telescoped from syn- + mentality]
References in periodicals archive ?
Syntality could not be predicted directly from measured personality traits.
I here suggest four primary theoretical assertions which hold that leadership (1) is always, in every case, a political phenomenon; (2) is a phenomenon which is necessary but not necessarily sufficient to group syntality (the various performances exhibited by the group in an effort to achieve a goal); (3) may best be approached as an emergent and contingent process phenomenon within all social systems; and (4) within any given social system, in particular as its complexity increases beyond the most primitive levels, leadership roles and functions will be distributed among and circulate in kind, degree, and character among the actors within the system.
Interest in such effects can be traced as far back as Cattell's (1948) notion of syntality - those activities that synergistically combine to make a group a unique entity.