syntactic


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Related to syntactic: syntactic error, Syntactic foam

syntactic

adjective Referring to the order, format and content of clinical trial data and/or documents, which contrasts to the trial’s semantics.

syntactic

(sĭn-tăk′tĭk)
Concerning or affecting syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
When these two elements match in form, as in (5) below, they conform to grammatical or syntactic agreement (Corbett 2006, 155):
Sankaran and Kishore, Investigation of Bending Modulus of Fiber-Reinforced Syntactic Foams for Sandwich and Structural Applications, Polym.
Whereas, the morphological errors were next in number and syntactic errors were only two in number.
The solid microspheres can be expanded into foams with a closed-cell cellular structure when exposed to increased temperature [20], Despite only a few reports found, EPS-filled syntactic foam has shown its high potential to become a novel class of engineering materials, especially for lightweight structural applications.
This article presents evidence for cross-linguistic differences in terms of the manner and place of syntactic attachment in expressive size suffixes.
The syntactic foam made by DST and NYU captures the lightness of foams, but adds substantial strength.
The special status of nominalizations (4) in syntactic structure of legal English was highlighted by many researchers (Bhatia 1994; Tiersma 1999; Alcaraz and Hughes 2002; Sanchez Febrero 2003; Gotti 2008; Godz-Roszkowski 2011; a.
with or without categorial relativism, adjectives and adverbs as one or as two categories) is not a central issue and the domain of the paper presented above as categorial space could be replaced by change of word-class or change of syntactic category between two (sub-)classes.
Specifically, it's syntactic and not semantic processing that is key to this type of musical communication.
The overall goal of the study is to apply a syntactic (formal) mechanism in order to solve a philosophical problem.
Idiomatic expressions are part of a community's cultural and linguistic heritage what makes them even more unmanageable for foreign learners to clearly recognize their syntactic pattern.