synonym

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syn·o·nym

(sin'ŏ-nim),
In biologic nomenclature, a term used to denote one of two or more names for the same species or taxonomic group (taxon).

synonym

(sĭn′ə-nĭm′)
n.
Biology One of two or more scientific names that have been applied to the same species or other taxonomic group.

syn′o·nym′ic, syn′o·nym′i·cal adj.
syn′o·nym′i·ty n.

synonym

(in taxonomy) any of a list of different names for the same taxon.

synonym

an alternative name for the same disease, sign, bacteria, etc. A key word or sign may have a number of synonyms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Urdu dictionaries give one word synonymic equivalents instead of definitions.
The synonymic use of the three above-mentioned terms is an unjustified restriction of the concept of LHR resulting in the narrowing of its sphere of application and functioning.
The labels only partially match, and the words Return and Dropoff do not appear to be synonymic in general-purpose thesauri (dropoff is not even considered a word in English, according to the Oxford English Dictionary).
42) Strangeness is, of course, also the defining feature of the day of Yeats's death, and is present in synonymic form in Auden's poem: "a day when one did something slightly unusual," Auden writes, a day on which the dead poet becomes "wholly given over to unfamiliar affections.
All he says in support of this notion is that synonymic and antonymic relationships characterize the members of a paradigm.
Phrases like "The palpable and obvious love of man for man" (where the physicality of "palpable" is underlined by its being linked with the synonymic "obvious") and "The beautiful generation that shall spring from our sides" (with its suggestion of parthenogenetic repro duction) give the postrevolutionary world a homoerotic flavor.
Associations may be extended through synonymic relays, for instance, one bird-name inspiring extension to others), and in one case at least, if the etymology of the French maquereau for 'pimp' is the Middle Dutch makelare, 'broker, agent', as generally believed, a popular etymology has been involved.
Simon and Schuster's International Spanish Dictionary and Santamaria (1983) were utilized to determine both synonymic and hyperonymic gender in some instances.
Mander or comander and dire frequently occur in this kind of phrase in Old French, whose rich vocabulary leads to a marked tendency to the use of binomial expressions or synonymic pairs.
The secret can only appear in utterances which decompose and destroy the terrifying possibility of revelation by displacement through chains of allosemic, metonymic, and synonymic diversions.
The synonymic concept of sabi refers to an aesthetic sense that results from the realization of Buddhist "emptiness": "A person awakened to the essential mutability of life does not dread physical waning or loneliness; rather, he or she accepts these facts with quiet resignation and even finds in them a source of enjoyment.