syncytium


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Related to syncytium: syncytiotrophoblast

syncytium

 [sin-sish´e-um]
a multinucleate mass of protoplasm produced by the merging of cells. adj., adj syncyt´ial.

syn·cy·ti·um

, pl.

syn·cy·ti·a

(sin-si'shē-ŭm, -ă; -sit'ē-ŭm),
A multinucleated protoplasmic mass formed by the secondary union of originally separate cells.
[Mod. L. fr. syn- + G. kytos, cell]

syncytium

/syn·cy·ti·um/ (sin-sish´e-um) a multinucleate mass of protoplasm produced by the merging of cells.

syncytium

(sĭn-sĭsh′ē-əm)
n. pl. syn·cytia (-sĭsh′ē-ə)
A multinucleated mass of cytoplasm that is not separated into individual cells.

syn·cy′ti·al (-sĭsh′ē-əl) adj.

syncytium

[sinsit′ē·əm] pl. syncytia
Etymology: Gk, syn + kytos, cell
a group of cells in which the cytoplasm of one cell is continuous with that of adjoining cells, resulting in a multinucleate unit. syncytial, adj.

syn·cy·ti·um

, pl. syncytia (sin-sish'ē-ŭm, -ă)
A multinucleated protoplasmic mass formed by the secondary union of originally separate cells.
[Mod. L. fr. syn- + G. kytos, cell]

syncytium

a cellular structure containing many nuclei.

syncytium

a multinucleate cellular mass produced by the fusing of cells.

syncytium-forming virus
members of the family Retroviridae, genus Spumavirus. The best known of these viruses are found in cats and cattle. It should be noted, however, that viruses of several families, including herpesviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses and retroviruses, produce syncytia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its envelope gene, however, remains well preserved and active in a few human tissues, including the placental syncytium.
A syncytium secretes at least two proteins that attract immune cells to fuse with it.
The neoplastic cells form a closely packed syncytium of uniform, monotonous, oval to slightly spindle-shaped cells with indistinct cell borders that contain vesicular to hyperchromatic, round to oval to spindle-shaped nuclei.
These may be syncytial changes similar to the syncytium formation caused by HIV in cells infected in vitro.
They refer to the process of cell fusion as syncytium formation.
At 48 hours after infection, a strong cytopathic effect was observed, including syncytium formation.
One main difference is that in humans the syncytiotrophoblasts arise from the fusion of cytotrophoblast cells and form a true syncytium with no lateral cell membranes, whereas in rats or mice three trophoblast layers are present between maternal blood and fetal blood capillaries (for comprehensive reviews, see Enders and Blankenship 1999; Takata et al.
Nielson and Ladefoged[10] favored a myoepithelial origin, hypothesizing that the myoepithelial cells enlarge and merge together to form a syncytium.
They say this effect occurred despite the absence of CD4 and syncytium formation .
Members of the genus Orthoreovirus are classified as fusogenic or nonfusogenic, depending on their ability to cause syncytium formation in cell culture.