synapsis

(redirected from synapses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

synapsis

 [sĭ-nap´sis]
the pairing off and union of homologous chromosomes from male and female pronuclei at the start of meiosis.

sy·nap·sis

(si-nap'sēz),
The point-for-point pairing of homologous chromosomes during the prophase of meiosis.
Synonym(s): synaptic phase
[G. a connection, junction]

synapsis

/syn·ap·sis/ (sĭ-nap´sis) the point-for-point pairing off of homologous chromosomes from male and female pronuclei during prophase of meiosis.

synapsis

(sĭ-năp′sĭs)
n. pl. synap·ses (-sēz)
The side-by-side association of homologous chromosomes during the first prophase of meiosis.

synapsis

[sinap′sis] pl. synapses
the pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiotic prophase in gametogenesis to form double or bivalent chromosomes.

syn·apse

(sin'aps)
The functional membrane-to-membrane contact of the nerve cell with another nerve cell, an effector (muscle, gland) cell, or a sensory receptor cell. The synapse subserves the transmission of nerve impulses, commonly from a club-shaped axon terminal (the presynaptic element) to the circumscript patch of the plasma membrane of the receiving cell (the postsynaptic element) on which the synapse occurs. In most cases, the impulse is transmitted by means of a chemical transmitter substance (such as acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, dopamine, norepinephrine) released into a synaptic cleft that separates the presynaptic from the postsynaptic membrane; the transmitter is stored in synaptic vesicles in the presynaptic element. In other synapses, transmission takes place by direct propagation of the bioelectrical potential from the presynaptic to the postsynaptic membrane.
Synonym(s): synapsis.
[syn- + G. hapto, to clasp]

synapsis

  1. the lying together of structures as in, for example, the junction of two nerve cells.
  2. (in genetics) the pairing of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES in prophase 1 of MEIOSIS; the alignment of homologous regions of DNA prior to RECOMBINATION in prokaryotes.

synapsis

the pairing off and union of homologous chromosomes from male and female pronuclei at the start of meiosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Artificial synapse could connect processors and store memories within future computers
These results were taken as evidence for the stability of synapses after initial formation and for their slow differentiation into mature synapses.
Along with this increase, synapses were destroyed, the team found.
Sulzer says, "the removal of inappropriate synapses may be just as important.
The part of the SIRP-alpha protein that floats into the synapse "gap" latches on to a receptor on the other side, called a CD47 receptor.
The nuclear zone contained the ciliated pigmented photoreceptor cells, the synaptic zone contained numerous synapses and mitochondria, and the nonsynaptic zone had neurites with few synapses and few mitochondria (Fig.
Commenting on the significance of these findings Dr Jeffrey Cummings of UCLA, and Chair of Prana's Scientific Advisory Board, noted that, "the role of Abeta oligomers in damaging synapses resulting in cognitive impairment is well established in the literature.
With our approach, however, we can't determine if extra professional experience actually caused new synapses to form, or if people with more synapses tended to choose challenging professions.
Brain science has not pointed to new ways of raising or teaching children that will really stimulate those synapses above and beyond what normal experiences provide.
We have both excitatory and inhibitory synapses," Dr.
Her study focused on the visual system in rats, a convenient model for studying plasticity and how new circuits develop because retinal neurons are just one synapse away from the brain.