amine

(redirected from sympathomimetic amines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to sympathomimetic amines: atropine

amine

 [am´in, ah´mēn]
an organic compound containing nitrogen.
biogenic amine bioamine.
sympathomimetic a's amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, the group includes the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.
vasoactive a's amines that cause vasodilation and increase small vessel permeability, such as histamine and serotonin.

a·mine

, primary aminesecondary aminetertiary aminequaternary ammonium ion (ă-mēn', am'in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine; that of two atoms, a secondary amine; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

(ah-mēn´) (am´in) an organic compound containing nitrogen; any of a group of compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals.
biogenic amine  a type of amine synthesized by plants and animals and frequently involved in signaling, e.g., neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin; others are hormones or components of vitamins, phospholipids, bacteria, or ribosomes, e.g., cadaverine, choline, histamine, and spermine.
sympathomimetic amines  amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, comprising the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.

amine

[am′in, əmēn′]
Etymology: L, ammonia
(in chemistry) an organic derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn')
A substance derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine, e.g., NH2CH3; that of two atoms, a secondary amine, e.g., NH(CH3)2; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine, e.g., N(CH3)3; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, e.g., +N(CH3)4, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

A class of organic compounds derived from ammonia by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms by a member of the paraffin series or by an aromatic group. Amines occur widely in the body, and many drugs are amines.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn') Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable as shown here.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals.

amine

an organic compound containing nitrogen.

biogenic a's
amine neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine.
direct-acting sympathomimetic a's
activate adrenergic effector cells, e.g. catecholamine, directly and do not need adrenergic nerves to exert their effects.
amine hormones
enteroendocrine cells, distributed widely in the gastric, intestinal and pancreatic tissue, synthesize peptide and amine hormones that control the secretion of digestive juices. See also apud cells.
amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells
toxic a's
occur in plants, e.g. cyclopamine, tyramine.
vasoactive amine
amine that causes vasodilatation and increases small vessel permeability, e.g. histamine and serotonin.
References in periodicals archive ?
A disorder of sympathomimetic amines leading to increased vascular permeability may be the etiologic factor in various treatment refractory health problems in women.
Thin-layer chromatography, performed the next day as part of the comprehensive drug screen, identified the sympathomimetic amine as PPA and also picked up the presence of acetaminophen.
GC-MS identification of sympathomimetic amine drugs in urine: rapid methodology applicable for emergency clinical toxicology.
BROVANA, as with other sympathomimetic amines, should be used with caution in patients with cardiovascular disorders, especially coronary insufficiency, cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension; in patients with convulsive disorders or thyrotoxicosis; and in patients who are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines.
Sympathomimetic amines may produce central nervous system stimulation with convulsions or cardiovascular collapse with accompanying hypotension.
COMBIVENT contains albuterol and should be used with caution in patients with convulsive disorders, hyperthyroidism, or diabetes mellitus, and in patients who are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines.
Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate extended-release) capsules CIV is contraindicated in pregnancy; in patients with glaucoma; in hyperthyroidism; in patients receiving treatment or within 14 days following treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); or in patients with hypersensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, topiramate, or any of the inactive ingredients in Qsymia.
Important Safety Information Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate extended-release) capsules CIV is contraindicated in pregnancy; in patients with glaucoma; in hyperthyroidism; in patients receiving treatment or within 14 days following treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); or in patients with hypersensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, topiramate, or any of the inactive ingredients in Qsymia.
Also, patients should not use AZILECT(R) if they are taking any of the following medications: antidepressants; sympathomimetic amines including amphetamines, cold medications, and weight-reducing products that contain pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine and ephedrine; cyclobenzaprine; Demerol; dextromethorphan; MAO inhibitors; pain medications and St.
John's wort, mirtazapine, cyclobenzaprine, sympathomimetic amines including over-the-counter cold preparations, and local anesthetics containing sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors.