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symbol

 [sim´bol]
1. something, particularly an object, representing something else.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a representation or perception that replaces unconscious mental content.
phallic symbol in psychoanalytic theory, any pointed or upright object which may represent the phallus or penis.

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl),
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
See also: conventional signs.
2. In chemistry, an abbreviation of the name of an element, radical, or compound, expressing in chemical formulas one atom or molecule of that element (for example, H and O in H2O); in biochemistry, an abbreviation of trivial names of molecules used primarily in combination with other similar symbols to construct larger assemblies (for example, Gly for glycine, Ado for adenosine, Glc for glucose).
See also: conventional signs.
3. In psychoanalysis, an object or action that is interpreted to represent some repressed or unconscious desire, often sexual.
See also: conventional signs.
4. A philosophical-linguistic sign.
See also: conventional signs.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]

symbol

/sym·bol/ (sim´bol)
1. something, particularly an object, that represents something else.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a representation or perception that replaces unconscious mental content.

phallic symbol  in psychoanalytic theory, any pointed or upright object which may represent the phallus or penis.

symbol

[sim′bəl]
Etymology: Gk, symbolon, sign
1 an image, object, action, or other stimulus that represents something else by reason of conscious association, convention, or another relationship, such as a flag or a statue.
2 an object, mode of behavior, or feeling that disguises a repressed emotional conflict through an unconscious association rather than through an objective relationship, as in dreams and anxiety.

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl)
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
2. In chemistry, an abbreviation of the name of an element, radical, or compound, expressing in chemical formulas one atom or molecule of that element (e.g., H and O in H2O).
3. In psychoanalysis, an object or action interpreted to represent some repressed or unconscious desire.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl)
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
2. In chemistry, abbreviation of name of an element, radical, or compound.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]
References in periodicals archive ?
To go back for more adjustments, just click on the symbol.
As with the Flowchart menu, the Connectors menu disappears when you select a symbol and that also produces the crosshair mouse pointer.
Click and drag the connector to the destination symbol until its connector sites appear and release the mouse button.
Sometimes the few words of text within a flowchart symbol aren't sufficient to explain a flowchart process.
To resize a callout, click on the line portion of the symbol.
If a flowchart is too large for a single page and you don't want the image reduced, divide the flowchart into separate pages and use an off-page connector symbol as shown in exhibit 13, above, to tell the viewer that the chart flows to the next page.
In exhibit 1, a hyperlink attached to the off-page connector symbol will, when clicked, advance the view to a separate worksheet.
If you wish to amend the symbol, you must use a right mouse click.
The latest innovation from Symbol is the Taut Band Element (TBE), which is a highly reliable scan element that delivers higher scan rates and multiple pattern generation in a miniature package.
The PL-423 provides Symbol OEM customers state of the art software algorithms for world class decode ranges and speeds, as well as fast image transfer via standard RS232 interface.
These new scan engines enable Symbol and its OEM customers to proliferate PDF capability across their product lines and capitalize on these opportunities," said Brian Viscount, senior director, scanning systems, Symbol Technologies.