symbiosis


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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

/sym·bi·o·sis/ (sim″bi-o´sis) pl. symbio´ses   [Gr.]
1. in parasitology, the close association of two dissimilar organisms, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between mother and infant.

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life
1 a mode of living characterized by a close association between organisms of different species.
2 a state in which two people are emotionally dependent on each other.
3 a pathologic inability of a child to separate from its mother emotionally and sometimes physically. symbiotic, adj.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

symbiosis

close association, e.g. commensalism between two species, of benefit to both

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

the biological association of two individuals or populations of different species, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Symbiosis also helps build reefs--corals that host algae can deposit calcium carbonate, the hard skeleton that forms the reefs, up to 10 times faster than nonsymbiotic corals
JA: As a result of increased global demand, Symbiosis has grown by around 40% over the last year and has also continued to recruit steadily, increasing staff by 30% to meet demand for its specialist aseptic fill/finish service.
In fact, it is recognized that when preparing the symbiosis with Rhizobium or with Glomus, molecular signals between the plant and the microsymbiont partner take place and and has the effect of the proliferation of root system which would allow the root to achieve the microorganism in the soil and establish the symbiotic relationship with it
Some of the many examples of symbiosis include clown fish with anemones, cleaner shrimp with fish, sea slugs solar-powered by cyanobacteria, and sponges--the microbial hotels of the reef.
Symbiosis was established in 2008 to offer healthcare services in the Gulf States.
Many animals in tropical sea areas depend on symbiosis with the zooxanthellal algae Symbiodinium to live in oligotrophic waters (Rowan 1998, LaJeunesse 2001, Baker 2003, Coffroth & Santos 2005).
AFTER THE Common Aptitude Test, and just before the equally popular XAT ( XLRI Aptitude Test), it's time for MBA aspirants to get ready for the other big management entrance exam, Symbiosis National Aptitude ( SNAP) Test, which is being held on December 16.
The opening ceremony included a guided tour of the facility for the guests who included Dr Mohammad Al Zarouni, vice-chairman and CEO of Dubai Silicon Oasis Authority, Dr Syed Atiq Hussain Naqvi, CEO, medical director, and Dr Riffat Khan, executive director of Symbiosis Medical Centre as well as other officials.
With this issue of The Biological Bulletin, the symbiosis community celebrates the life of Lynn Margulis, who died this past year on November 22, 2011.
This study used mutant tomato plants to demonstrate that the plant hormone auxin is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiosis between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi.
In this paper, a quintet of Russian scientists investigates the developmental genetics of plant-microbial symbiosis from developmental and applied viewpoints.