swarm

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swarm

  1. a group of social insects, especially bees led by a queen, that has left the parent hive in order to start a new colony
  2. a large mass of small animals, especially insects.
  3. ability of certain MICROORGANISMS to move in a collective and ordered manner across a surface. For example, colonies of Proteus swarm in a series of concentric rings across an AGAR plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
occidentalis swarms vary widely in size, yet each is able to construct its nest with a number of cells that correlates closely with the number of wasps in the founding group (Forsyth, 1978; Jeanne and Nordheim, 1996).
The host gneisses of the Tarssartoq dykes contain an older dyke swarm, known as the Inaluk dykes, which were metamorphosed and deformed before intrusion of the Tarssartoq dykes.
Flights of fixed-wing swarms will provide persistent autonomous air support as they orbit the battlefield like flocks of angry birds.
An earthquake swarm is a burst of earthquake activity clustered in a specific area in a short period of time due to movement of a fault,' the Phivolcs explained.
j] are the best local--lbest and global--gbest positions of the i-th particle, found respectively by only one i-th particle and all the particles of the j-th swarm.
Along with our observations aboard USNS Comfort, we have received other anecdotal reports of bee swarms aboard various seafaring vessels including previous missions aboard the Comfort.
And in 2012, it went a step further when it fielded a custom-made guided rocket of its own that is specifically optimized for defeating swarms of boats.
In principle, even starting from totally random modes of comparison between the two swarms, the classifier should be able to quickly deemphasize irrelevant aspects of the agent swarm while focusing in on those that actually impact the accuracy of its guesses.
Beekeepers sometimes provide a landing spot by planting a small sacrificial tree in their bee yard, giving swarms a place to settle, and the beekeeper a chance to catch them.
The point at issue in Kearry v Pattinson (1939 1AER) was as to the ownership of a swarm of bees which had, in the ordinary course of nature, swarmed from Mr Kearry's hive on a summers day.
Below we give a brief characterization of the region and of the relevant earthquakes swarms, as well as the description of the EME measurements, their processing and the judgement of the results.
Within insects, Diptera are different from most other insects in their mating behavior because of their ability to mate aerially, in swarms (reviewed by Downes 1969).