susceptibility


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susceptibility

 [sŭ-sep″tĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
the state of being susceptible.

sus·cep·ti·bil·i·ty

(sŭ-sep'ti-bil'i-tē),
1. Likelihood of an individual to develop ill effects from an external agent, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, high altitude, or ambient temperature.
2. In magnetic resonance imaging, the loss of magnetization signal caused by rapid phase dispersion because of marked local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, as with the multiple air-soft tissue interfaces in the lung.

susceptibility

[səsep′tibil′itē]
Etymology: L, suscipere, to undertake
the condition of being vulnerable to a disease or disorder.

susceptibility

The likelihood of suffering from an adverse effect or disorder when exposed to a noxious stimulus or pathogen. See Cancer susceptibility.

sus·cep·ti·bil·i·ty

(sŭ-sep'ti-bil'i-tē)
1. Likelihood of an individual to develop ill effects from an external agent, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, high altitude, or ambient temperature.
2. Likelihood that a given pathogenic microorganism will be inhibited or killed by a given microbial agent.
Synonym(s): sensitivity (4) .
3. magnetic resonance imaging The loss of magnetization signal caused by rapid phase dispersion because of marked local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, as with the multiple air-soft tissue interfaces in the lung; susceptibility measurement can estimate calcium content in trabecular bone.

susceptibility

A more than normal tendency to contract an infection or other disease.

susceptibility

the state of being susceptible. Refers usually to infectious disease but may be to physical factors such as wetting or to psychological factors such as harassment. Signs which suggest a state of increased susceptibility to infection are: infections in the first few weeks of life, repeated bouts of infection, infections with nonvirulent pathogens, attacks of illness after vaccination with attenuated vaccines, and low leukocyte counts. See also immune deficiency disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
gonorrhoeae susceptibility and antimicrobial drug prescribing for any of the studied antimicrobial drugs (Table 2).
Shows number of buildings in low, moderate and high susceptibility classes in Muzaffarabad.
Treatment decisions were assessed assuming that direct susceptibility results were accurate and that physicians received the result and made the appropriate antibiotic selection based on the result.
Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and the Indicator of Decreased Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolated from Dhulikhel Hospital, Nepal.
Susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) is executed with magnitude and phase images to identify the local susceptibility changes between tissues due to iron deposition and induces field shifts that can be determined on phase images which are more directly related to iron concentration3, 4.
The radiated susceptibility test levels typically are produced using a signal generator and RF power amplifier in conjunction with an antenna that is usable over the test-frequency range.
Amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam and ertapenem retained excellent susceptibility profiles to these isolates.
What is the basis of genetic susceptibility, and has that changed as a result of gene--environment interaction over the past 20 years in a way that is associated with susceptibility to air pollutant exposures?
Because the thoughts of susceptibility and severity tend to arouse fear and anxiety, health risk messages hold the potential to engender adverse reactions in which individuals defensively deny the health threat or engage in more risky behavior (i.
Because health promotion and disease prevention are scientific domains for nursing practice, it is important that nurses understand the benefits and drawbacks of using genetic susceptibility information to influence health-related behavior.