susceptibility

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susceptibility

 [sŭ-sep″tĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
the state of being susceptible.

sus·cep·ti·bil·i·ty

(sŭ-sep'ti-bil'i-tē),
1. Likelihood of an individual to develop ill effects from an external agent, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, high altitude, or ambient temperature.
2. In magnetic resonance imaging, the loss of magnetization signal caused by rapid phase dispersion because of marked local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, as with the multiple air-soft tissue interfaces in the lung.

susceptibility

[səsep′tibil′itē]
Etymology: L, suscipere, to undertake
the condition of being vulnerable to a disease or disorder.

susceptibility

The likelihood of suffering from an adverse effect or disorder when exposed to a noxious stimulus or pathogen. See Cancer susceptibility.

sus·cep·ti·bil·i·ty

(sŭ-sep'ti-bil'i-tē)
1. Likelihood of an individual to develop ill effects from an external agent, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, high altitude, or ambient temperature.
2. Likelihood that a given pathogenic microorganism will be inhibited or killed by a given microbial agent.
Synonym(s): sensitivity (4) .
3. magnetic resonance imaging The loss of magnetization signal caused by rapid phase dispersion because of marked local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, as with the multiple air-soft tissue interfaces in the lung; susceptibility measurement can estimate calcium content in trabecular bone.

susceptibility

A more than normal tendency to contract an infection or other disease.

susceptibility

the state of being susceptible. Refers usually to infectious disease but may be to physical factors such as wetting or to psychological factors such as harassment. Signs which suggest a state of increased susceptibility to infection are: infections in the first few weeks of life, repeated bouts of infection, infections with nonvirulent pathogens, attacks of illness after vaccination with attenuated vaccines, and low leukocyte counts. See also immune deficiency disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, the challenge for the future of environmental health research is to use advances in science as a means for understanding exposure and susceptibilities, while retaining an emphasis on prevention of exposure, and working with diverse actors to address fundamental causes of social disparities.
Susceptibilities were assigned using the breakpoints currently recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), (8) and E-test MICs were interpreted according to the manufacturer's instructions.
Since there is no general agreement within the medical genetic community concerning the most appropriate mode by which to offer testing for genetic susceptibilities, we are left to wonder how Dr.
Furthermore, different components or other PM attributes may target people with different susceptibilities (e.
In vitro susceptibilities of Candida dubliniensis isolates tested against the new triazole and echinocandin antifungal agents.
Investigate how aging influences the interaction of environmental factors and individual susceptibilities.
Antimicrobial susceptibilities of common pathogens causing nosocomial pneumonia: 2001-2002 TRUST surveillance.
The hypothesis of PD pathogenesis underlying his group's investigation is that chemicals that provoke oxidative stress reactions destroy dopaminergic neurons preferentially among persons with genetically determined susceptibilities.
It highlights the importance of retaining the laboratory capacity to monitor antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial STD isolates.
This later finding, along with the emergence of new molecular techniques for investigating genetic variation between individuals, is now allowing environmental health researchers to examine inherited susceptibilities more carefully.
Treatment, performed according to the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates, consisted of vancomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin for 21 days.
4) studies on the intersections and synergies between genetic susceptibilities and environmental factors, as well as strategies for identifying putative toxicants and other environmental factors involved in the etiology of ALS;