surveillance


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Related to surveillance: surveillance system

surveillance

 [sur-vāl´ans]
1. watching or monitoring.
2. a procedure used instead of quarantine to control the spread of infectious disease, involving close supervision during the incubation period of possible contacts of individuals exposed to an infectious disease.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making.
surveillance: community in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of data for decision-making in the community.
surveillance: late pregnancy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of maternal-fetal data for treatment, observation, or admission. See also pregnancy.
surveillance and/or observation a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action through which the nurse examines and monitors physical and behavioral responses to disease or injury and to the prescribed medical and/or nursing therapy.
surveillance: remote electronic in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition of patient data via electronic modalities (telephone, video conferencing, e-mail) from distant locations as well as interpretation and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making with individuals or populations. See also telehealth.
surveillance: safety in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing collection and analysis of information about the patient and the environment for use in promoting and maintaining patient safety.
skin surveillance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the collection and analysis of patient data to maintain skin and mucous membrane integrity. See also skin care.
surveillance (omaha) in the omaha system, an intervention on the first level of the intervention scheme, defined as nursing activities of detection, measurement, critical analysis, and monitoring to indicate client status in relation to a given condition or phenomenon.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lănts),
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, or rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

surveillance1

[sərvā′ləns]
Etymology: Fr, surveiller, to watch over
1 supervision or observation of a patient or a health condition. It may include the use of closed-circuit television cameras and monitors to cover unattended locations from a central office.
2 a detailed examination or investigation for the accurate collection of data to record changes in the character of a population as at a particular time or, in a prospective or longitudinal surveillance, over a period. Retrospective surveillance might study the characteristics of a population in which a previous event occurred. The collection of data may include hospital records, morbidity and mortality statistics, death certificates, records of immunization, age groups, and various ecological and weather factors for the period of investigation, particularly if insect vectors are possible influences.

surveillance2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision making. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

surveillance

(1) The ongoing observation of the health of individuals or populations.
(2) The monitoring of diseases that have a known prevalence in a population.
(3) The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data.

surveillance

Epidemiology
1. The monitoring of diseases that have a certain prevalence in a population.
2. The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data. See Epidemiologic surveillance, Fluoride surveillance, Health surveillance, HIV surveillance, Immunosurveillance, Medical surveillance, Public health surveillance, Sentinel surveillance, Site-specific surveillance.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. Collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

surveillance

keeping a watch over.

active surveillance
sampling, including necropsy examination, of clinically normal samples of the population; important in the surveillance of diseases in which subclinical cases and carriers predominate.
epidemiological surveillance
watching over a population and recording data likely to have epidemiological significance, usually with the aim of early detection of disease. Essentially an interventionist exercise compared with monitoring, which is passive.
passive surveillance
examination of only clinically affected cases of specified diseases in the population.
References in periodicals archive ?
But few higher ed users opt to turn on the surveillance functionality.
What kind of electronic surveillance appropriately parries the threat posed by contemporary terrorists?
We describe results from the first active surveillance study in Lao PDR since the 2004 outbreak.
First, it claims its surveillance program is narrowly defined to known al-Qaeda contacts (in the words of this same memo: "The NSA activities described by the President are narrow in scope and aim"), but then the quote above says that the government is monitoring far too many calls for the Attorney General and other parts of the Justice Department to manage through the FISA process.
Once clunky and obtrusive, some surveillance devices are now so small they're nearly undetectable.
Although more research is needed to understand fully the complex relationship between external hazard concentrations, internal dose, and health effects, biomonitoring data are an important component for comprehensive environmental public health surveillance.
Therefore, we face a compelling demand to expand the current influenza surveillance system (6,22).
Although telecommunications carriers were required since 1970 to cooperate with law enforcement personnel in conducting lawfully authorized electronic surveillance, CALEA, for the first time, requires these carriers to modify the design of their equipment, facilities, and services to ensure that lawfully authorized electronic surveillance actually can be performed.
My first fear is that the government will expand intelligence investigations and break down the wall that Congress established after Watergate to prohibit the kind of surveillance that was conducted against domestic dissent during the civil rights and Vietnam War eras.
Mike Hardy, President of SCYF announced today that the Housing Authority, of the City of Bessemer, Alabama, will increase its Four Hundred Thousand Dollar digital surveillance network contract with SCYF to include remote monitoring of BHA's networked video surveillance systems.
International terrorism and data theft issues are emerging as the most serious concerns for the governments globally, resulting into increased demand for video surveillance systems.
1) in this issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases describes the use of syndromic surveillance to detect inhalational anthrax resulting from a hypothetical covert release of Bacillus anthracis spores at a major shopping mall.