surrogate motherhood


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surrogate motherhood

True surrogacy Motherhood in which a ♀ carries a gestational product in her uterus that is not her own genetically–one haploid set of genes is contributed by the genetic or natural father and the 2nd haploid is contributed by the genetic mother who, for various reasons–eg, hysterectomy, uterus didelphys, cannot carry fertilized ova. See Artificial reproduction, Baby M, Gestational surrogacy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The view of medical doctors is that surrogate motherhood is a form of medically assisted procreation that is usually only considered as a last option.
Russian Family Code includes two articles on surrogate motherhood.
See Amelia Gentleman, India Nurtures the Business of Surrogate Motherhood, N.
Surrogate motherhood is currently comprehensively regulated in South African law following the promulgation of chapter 19 of the Children's Act on 1 April 2010.
A few studies, however, point to another possible reason for surrogate motherhood, which is largely neglected in research grounded in Western settings.
There are clear limits that come with defining the different units of the family, however, the ethical problems people see with surrogate motherhood and defining "motherhood" come with societies competing ethical views.
Alta Charo, Legislative Approaches to Surrogate Motherhood, in SURROGATE MOTHERHOOD 88, 107 (Larry Gostin ed.
His book distinguishes itself from others on the same topic by emphasizing the legal regulation of nonmarket behavior, from familiar examples such as crime, accidents, corporate conduct, and lawsuits to less familiar examples such as drug addiction, sexual activity, surrogate motherhood, rescues at sea, flag desecration, democratic theory, and terrorism, thereby covering the legal system in greater breadth than many other law and economics textbook.
In the magazine article, Noda calls for Japan to introduce legislation that would authorize such things as surrogate motherhood and egg donations from third persons ''by acknowledging reality.
Feminist scholars have devoted considerable attention to assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood, amniocentesis, and ultrasound; (1) but there remains a paucity of ethnographic material about these technologies, in particular about surrogacy.
Our case is developed in response to criticisms of arguments we have made before in defense of commercial surrogate motherhood, particularly those criticisms made by Elizabeth Anderson, who is probably the most influential, eloquent, and forceful opponent of commercial surrogate motherhood or, as it is sometimes called, "contract pregnancy.
Although surrogate motherhood is illegal in China as part of the country's brutal one-child policy, it had been rarely enforced, according to Reuters.