suppression

(redirected from suppressions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to suppressions: unproclaimed

suppression

 [sŭ-presh´un]
the act of holding back or checking.
1. the stopping or inhibition of something, such as a secretion, excretion, normal discharge, or other function.
2. in psychiatry, conscious inhibition of an unacceptable impulse or idea as contrasted with repression, which is unconscious.
3. in genetics, a second mutation occurring at a site different from the first mutation site and able to mask or suppress the phenotypic expression of the first mutation; the organism appears to be reverted but is in fact doubly mutant.
4. inhibition of the erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium to prevent clinical attacks of malaria; used for prophylaxis.
5. cortical inhibition of perception of objects in all or part of the visual field of one eye during binocular vision.
bone marrow suppression reduction of the cell-forming functions of bone marrow, such as by a drug or because of replacement of the marrow by a disease process. Called also myelophthisis and myelosuppression.
labor suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as controlling uterine contractions prior to 37 weeks of gestation to prevent preterm birth. See also labor.
lactation suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the cessation of lactation and minimizing breast engorgement after childbirth.
overdrive suppression the suppression of intrinsic cellular automaticity by a rapid outside stimulus. In cardiology this refers to the inhibitory effect of a faster pacemaker on a slower pacemaker. The faster rate causes an accumulation of intracellular sodium, stimulating the sodium-potassium pump, which hyperpolarizes the cell so that it takes longer to reach threshold potential. This phenomenon is present in healthy His-Purkinje cells but decreases with a decrease in membrane potential and loss of fast sodium channels.

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn),
1. Deliberately excluding from conscious thought.
See also: epistasis. Compare: repression.
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
See also: epistasis. Compare: retention (2).
3. Checking of an abnormal flow or discharge, as in suppression of a hemorrhage.
See also: epistasis.
4. The effect of a second mutation that overwrites a phenotypic change caused by a previous mutation at a different point on the chromosome.
See also: epistasis.
5. Inhibition of vision in one eye when dissimilar images fall on corresponding retinal points.
6. The attenuation or arrest of an immune response.
[L. subprimo (subp-), pp. -pressus, to press down]

suppression

/sup·pres·sion/ (sŭ-presh´un)
1. the act of holding back or checking.
2. sudden stoppage of a secretion, excretion, or normal discharge.
3. in psychiatry, conscious inhibition of an unacceptable impulse or idea as contrasted with repression, which is unconscious.
4. in genetics, masking of the phenotypic expression of a mutation by the occurrence of a second (suppressor) mutation at a different site from the first; the organism appears to be reverted but is in fact doubly mutated.
5. inhibition of the erythrocytic stage of plasmodium as prophylaxis for clinical attacks of malaria.
6. cortical inhibition of perception of objects in all or part of the visual field of one eye during binocular vision.

bone marrow suppression  suppression of bone marrow activity, resulting in reduction in the number of platelets, red cells, and white cells.
overdrive suppression  transient suppression of automaticity in a cardiac pacemaker following a period of stimulation by a more rapidly discharging pacemaker.

suppression

(sə-prĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of suppressing.
2. The state of being suppressed.
3. Psychiatry Conscious exclusion of unacceptable desires, thoughts, or memories from the mind.
4. Genetics The inhibition of gene expression.

suppression

[səpresh′ən]
Etymology: L, supprimere
(in psychoanalysis) the conscious inhibition of or effort to conceal unacceptable or painful thoughts, desires, impulses, feelings, or acts. Compare repression.

suppression

Slowing down, restraint, inhibition Psychiatry The conscious effort to control and conceal unacceptable impulses, thoughts, feelings, acts

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn)
1. Deliberate exclusion from conscious thought.
Compare: repression
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
Compare: retention (2)
3. Checking of an abnormal flow or discharge, as in suppression of a hemorrhage.
See also: epistasis
4. The effect of a second mutation, which overwrites a phenotypic change caused by a previous mutation at a different point on the chromosome.
5. Inhibition of vision in one eye when dissimilar images fall on corresponding retinal points.
[L. subprimo, pp. -pressus, to press down]

suppression

  1. failure to develop any organ or structure.
  2. (genetics) the mechanism whereby the effects of a primary MUTATION are suppressed or negated by a second mutation, the SUPPRESSOR MUTATION, that occurs at a different site from that of the primary mutation. Thus a function lost by a primary mutation can be totally or partially restored by a suppressor mutation. Suppression may be intergenic, where the suppressor mutation occurs in a different GENE from that of the primary mutation, or intragenic, where the suppressor mutation occurs at a different site in the same gene.

suppression,

n 1., in naturopathic medicine, the successful relief of symptoms without curing the underlying illness or disease.
2., in homeopathy, the elimination of symptoms, often with topicals, without curing deeper aspects of the disease. Thought to result in more serious inner disease later.

suppression 

The process by which the brain inhibits the retinal image (or part of it) of one eye, when both eyes are simultaneously stimulated. This occurs to avoid diplopia as in strabismus, in uncorrected anisometropia, in retinal rivalry, etc. Syn. suspenopsia (this term actually refers to voluntary suppression as occurs, for example, when using a monocular microscope with one eye); suspension (most often used when referring to partial suppression). See cheiroscope; physiological diplopia; Javal's grid; Mallett fixation disparity unit; Remy separator; retinal rivalry; Bagolini lens test; four prism dioptre base out test; FRIEND test; Turville infinity balance test; Worth's four dot test; vectogram.

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn)
1. Deliberately excluding from conscious thought.
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
Compare: retention (3)
[L. subprimo (subp-), pp. -pressus, to press down]

suppression

1. sudden stoppage of a secretion, excretion or normal discharge.
2. in genetics, restoration of a lost function by a second mutation either in a gene other than that involved in the primary mutation, or within the same gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among them, four patients whose EEG clearly showed a burst suppression pattern were selected for the qEEG analysis in this study, using artifact-free EEG segments for at least 20 minutes chosen by an expert neurologist (H.
The median filtering over channels may lose time/frequency characteristics of the original EEG, but burst suppression patterns generally have synchrony over channels.
Figure 2 shows an example of EEG burst suppression patterns in both the time and the frequency domains.
To do burst suppression segmentation in the time-frequency domain, we newly defined a joint time-frequency vector [f.
Entropy serves as a method to quantify the order/disorder in signals, typically used for measuring the variety existing in burst suppression patterns.
Equations (7) and (8) denote the likelihood of the burst and suppression of feature z, and, in this study, we supposed the decision to maximize the likelihood.
Two types of articulatory suppression were used, i.
The experimental design was a 2 (phonological similarity: dissimilar and similar)x 3 (learning condition: silent control, intermittent suppression and continuous suppression) factorial.
In the articulatory suppression conditions, the memory task and the articulatory suppression task had to be performed simultaneously.
In the intermittent suppression condition, they were encouraged to repeat 'ah' in a staccato fashion at a rate of approximately three to four times per second and were cautioned if their rate of articulation showed signs of becoming slower.
As is evident from the figure, clear phonological similarity effects were obtained in both the control condition and the continuous suppression condition but not in the intermittent condition.
The reopened monasteries and religious houses were again possessed by the Crown, and the suppression of the lesser monasteries continued.