supplement

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supplement

(sŭp′lə-mənt)
sup′ple·men·tar′i·ty (-târ′ĭ-tē) n.
sup′ple·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -trē), sup′ple·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
sup′ple·men·ta′tion (-mĕn-tā′shən) n.

supplement

(sup'le-ment?) [L. supplementum, an addition]
1. Something added to a food or a diet to increase its nutritional value. Synonym: oral nutritional supplement
2. To add.
supplemental (sup?le-ment'al), adjective

sup·ple·ment

(sŭplĕ-mĕnt)
Agent or procedure added to complete, extend, or reinforce something.
[L. supplementum, fr. suppleo, to fill, + -mentum, noun suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
54) I am thinking, of course, of Jacques Derrida's discussion of the logic of supplementarity.
The supplementarity of literature and history is also at once a complementarity, their relationship projecting both a convergence as well as a divergence, a confirmation and a refutation, a validation and a denial, an antithesis as well as a synthesis, asynchronously of the one by the other.
In his discussion of forgiveness, Derrida voices support for a "pure and unconditional forgiveness" which is not afflicted by the logic of supplementarity (On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, trans.
Additionality, diversion, supplementarity and carry over
In other words, as uncertainty decreases, the possible impact of complementarity and supplementarity of styles on performance also reduces (Auh and Menguc 2005).
Such surplus value resonates with the notion of supplementarity (signifying both substitution and accretion) that Derrida developed in Of Grammatology: (35) the metaphor "overflows," adds a "supplementary trait"--but also takes away something.
In times of intense ideological pressure like the present, when the space in which the novel and history normally coexist like two cows on the same pasture, each minding its own business, is squeezed almost to nothing, the novel, it seems to me, has only two options: supplementarity or rivalry .
Here's an example, from her discussion of Sidney Owenson's celebrated novel of 1806, The Wild Irish Girl: "Shifts between the text's romance, novelistic, and propagandistic registers; appear most obviously in its supplementarity, whereby a digressive paratext insistently interrupts the narrative with historical data culled from eighteenth-century antiquarianism" (161).
Derrida is said to "joyfully embrace a Nietzchean notion of play, a groundless and aimless play in which all standards and distinctions are meaningless, a form of play which rules out in advance any notion of 'progress' (progression) and in which meaning is forever deferred in an endless supplementarity.
But the term "remains" is also suggestive of the disruptive performance of supplementarity, where, as Derrida has shown us, residue points paradoxically but inexorably to the incompleteness of that which appears on the surface to be un-problematically whole and self-present.
In The Supplement of Copula, Jacques Derrida writes of the figure of copula--the joining word suggesting identical existence of the subject and the predicate--as the emergence of supplementarity.
It was only when the Celt was seen by the English as a necessary supplement to their national character that the Irish were able to extend the idea of supplementarity to that of radical difference" (24).

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