supplement


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

supplement

(sŭp′lə-mənt)
sup′ple·men·tar′i·ty (-târ′ĭ-tē) n.
sup′ple·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -trē), sup′ple·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
sup′ple·men·ta′tion (-mĕn-tā′shən) n.

supplement

(sup'le-ment?) [L. supplementum, an addition]
1. Something added to a food or a diet to increase its nutritional value. Synonym: oral nutritional supplement
2. To add.
supplemental (sup?le-ment'al), adjective

sup·ple·ment

(sŭplĕ-mĕnt)
Agent or procedure added to complete, extend, or reinforce something.
[L. supplementum, fr. suppleo, to fill, + -mentum, noun suffix]
References in classic literature ?
This was a special body raised by the railways and colliery owners to supplement the efforts of the ordinary civil police, who were perfectly helpless in the face of the organized ruffianism which terrorized the district.
Deane, he considered, was the "knowingest" man of his acquaintance, and he had besides a ready causticity of tongue that made an agreeable supplement to Mr.
Con- trasting vividly with this ruin was the neat dresser, stained in the fashion, pale green, and with a number of copper and tin vessels below it, the wallpaper imitating blue and white tiles, and a couple of coloured supplements fluttering from the walls above the kitchen range.
I accordingly engaged a room in the house of a lady of pure French extraction and education, who supplements the shortcomings of an income insufficient to the ever-growing demands of the Parisian system of sense-gratification, by providing food and lodging for a limited number of distinguished strangers.
It was a fair size, but it looked quite large, since there was hardly any furniture in it; there was no carpet on the floor; there were no pictures on the walls; and most rooms had something, photographs or supplements in cheap frames from the Christmas numbers of the illustrated papers.
The correspondents wrote it up, and once more Burning Daylight, King of the Klondike, was sensationally featured in the Sunday supplements of the United States.
Manufacturers are not legally allowed to state that a particular supplement will treat, cure, and prevent disease, however it is permissible for the makers to suggest that a specific supplement may contribute to well-being and maintenance of good health.
When asked why they take supplements, 53% of supplement users said they took dietary supplements for overall health and wellness; 35% said it was to fill in nutrient gaps in their diet.
As chairman of the 2006 EEE meeting (and hence the supplement editor), I started out with a rather ambitious program, which consisted of:
Unlike the 2005 Supplement, which only included new or significantly revised sections, the 2006 Supplement was issued in its entirety.
When asked about their images of supplement products (multiple answers allowed), 50.