supination


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supination

 [soo″pĭ-na´shun]
the act of assuming the supine position; placing or lying on the back. Applied to the hand, the act of turning the palm upward.

su·pi·na·tion

(sū'pi-nā'shŭn), [TA]
1. The condition of being supine; the act of assuming or of being placed in a supine position; rotation of the forearm such that the palm of the hand faces anteriorly to the anatomic position; rotation of the foot such that the plantar surface of rotated upward.
2. The opposite of pronation.

supination

/su·pi·na·tion/ (soo″pĭ-na´shun) [L. supinatio ] the act of assuming the supine position, or the state of being supine. Applied to the hand, the act of turning the palm forward (anteriorly) or upward, performed by lateral rotation of the forearm. Applied to the foot, it generally implies movements resulting in raising of the medial margin of the foot, hence of the longitudinal arch.

supination

[so̅o̅′pinā′shən]
Etymology: L, supinus, lying on the back
1 one of the kinds of rotation allowed by certain skeletal joints, such as the elbow and the wrist joints, which permit the palm of the hand to turn up.
2 assumption of a supine position, one of lying on the back, face up. Compare pronation. supinate, v.
enlarge picture
Supination and pronation

su·pi·na·tion

(sū'pi-nā'shŭn) [TA]
1. The condition of being supine; the act of assuming or of being placed in a supine position.
2. Transverse plane motion at the radioulnar joint or transverse tarsal joint.

supination

The act of turning the body to a SUPINE position or of turning the horizontal forearm so that the palm of the hand faces upward. Compare PRONATION.

supination

(1) of the foot: during normal gait immediately before 'take-off' from the toes, the ankle tends to angle outwards and the foot is supported briefly on its outer side. oversupination can cause the ankle to roll over towards the outer side, with possible ligament damage; (2) of the forearm: twisting movement which brings the palm of the hand to face upwards or forwards. See also pronation.

supination

moving into a supine position

supination

triplanar foot movement; forefoot adduction and plantarflexes + ankle plantarflexion + subtalar joint internal rotation (inversions); directs entire plantar surface towards sagittal plane of the body (Figure 1) (contrast with pronation)
Figure 1: A-foot pronation; C-foot supination; B-neutral foot (neither pronated nor supinated). This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

supination (sōōˈ·p·nāˑ·shn),

n lateral rotation of the radioulnar joint to face the palm upwards.
Enlarge picture
Supination.

supination

in humans, rotation of the forearm to bring the palm to face upward; in animals, the action is best in primates but is still significant in laboratory animals, cats and dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
This DOF is usually pronation and supination (forearm rotation), whether the design is passive or driven.
2007) stated that plantar flexion and supination were the injury mechanisms of inversion ankle sprain.
3) The patient is examined in the same position with the arm flexed up to 90[degrees] and full supination of the forearm.
Unlike condition 2, target postures required subjects to perform three motions, such as wrist flexion, wrist supination, and hand open, to achieve success.
Thus there must be normal supination of the subtalar joint in heel raise.
The dependent variables were maximum, minimum, mean, and range of wrist deviation; maximum velocity in each direction and mean velocity; and maximum acceleration in each direction and mean acceleration for flexion and extension, radial and ulnar deviation, and pronation and supination.
Flexion and supination is a position of stability, while extension and pronation is a position of relative instability.
3,16) Motion is coupled; pronation is combined with flexion and hyperextension with supination of the CMC joint.
Caption: FIGURE 3: Radiograph images of the patient's elbow in pronation and supination, 8 years postoperatively with no signs of recurrence.
no known trauma), both pronation and supination may be the underlying cause of the problem--as outlined by Michaud, 1997.
21) It functions as a stabilizer for gripping activities involving pronation and supination, and is a prime mover for wrist extension.
When using foot controls, for example, users must learn to associate motor actions, such as pronation or supination of the foot, with specific motor outcomes (customized for the user), such as wrist pronation or supination.