supinate

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supinate

 [soo´pĭ´nāt]
the act of turning the palm forward or upward, or of raising the medial margin of the foot.

su·pi·nate

(sū'pi-nāt),
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a supine (that is, face upward) position.
2. To perform supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supino, pp. -atus, to bend backwards, place on back, fr. supinus, supine]

supinate

/su·pi·nate/ (soo´pĭ-nāt) to assume or place in a supine position.

supinate

(so͞o′pə-nāt′)
v. supi·nated, supi·nating, supi·nates
v.tr.
1. To turn or rotate (the hand or forearm) so that the palm faces up or forward.
2. To turn or rotate (the foot) by adduction and inversion so that the outer edge of the sole bears the body's weight.
v.intr.
To be supinated; undergo supination.

su′pi·na′tion n.

su·pi·nate

(sū'pi-nāt)
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a supine (face upward) position.
2. To perform supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supino, pp. -atus, to bend backwards, place on back, fr. supinus, supine]

supinate

assume/move into a supine position
References in periodicals archive ?
PS] is defined as 0[degrees] when the forearm is fully supinated (Figure 1(c)).
For more complete first-web syndactyly, in which the thumb lies adducted and supinated in the same plane as the fingers, a single large, dorsal rotation-flap technique gives a deep, durable web space.
8) The preoperative Canadian Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society end-stage ankle arthritis classification distinguishes isolated ankle arthritis (type 1), ankle arthritis with intraarticular varus or valgus deformity, hindfoot instability or a tight heel cord (type 2), ankle arthritis with hindfoot deformity, tibial malunion, midfoot abductus or adductus, supinated midfoot, plantar flexed first ray, etc.
For the barbell bicep curl, participants grasped the bar evenly at shoulder width with a closed supinated grip.
The sliding effects on the supinated human body due to bed inclination].
Giuffre and Moss (23) described the optimal patient position to evaluate the full course of the tendon with the patient prone, shoulder abducted overhead, with elbow flexed to 90[degrees], and forearm fully supinated.
The participants were seated in the rig with their shoulder immobilized in a flexed position, supinated forearm, 90 [degrees] flexion of the elbow and the wrist secured with straps.
With the hand in a supinated position, gravity fully extends the wrist.
Based on the work by Lauge-Hansen, (4) this fracture begins with a supinated foot and an adduction force.
Care should be taken to place the forearm in a maximally supinated position and the drill and guide-wire directed distal and medial.
With the arm in the same position, the palm is then fully supinated, and the maneuver was repeated.