superego


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superego

 [soo″per-e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, a part of the psyche derived from both the id and the ego, which acts, largely unconsciously, as a monitor over the ego. It is that part of the personality concerned with social standards, ethics, and conscience. Early in life the superego is formed by the infant's identification with parents and other significant and esteemed persons in his or her life. The real or supposed expectations of these persons gradually are accepted as general rules of society and help form the “conscience.” The superego tends to be self-critical and in psychotic and anxious persons strong feelings of guilt and unworthiness can lead to self-punitive measures in an effort to resolve conflicts between the id, ego, and superego.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō),
In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

/su·per·ego/ (soo″per-e´go) in psychoanalysis, the aspect of the personality that acts as a monitor and evaluator of ego functioning, comparing it with an ideal standard.

superego

(so͞o′pər-ē′gō)
n. pl. supere·gos
In Freudian theory, the division of the unconscious that is formed through the internalization of moral standards of parents and society, and that censors and restrains the ego.

superego

[ē′gō]
Etymology: L, super, over; ego, I
(in psychoanalysis) that part of the psyche, functioning mostly in the unconscious, that develops when the standards of the parents and of society are incorporated into the ego. The superego has two parts, the conscience and the ego ideal. Also called the structure of the psyche that is governed by one's moral code. See also ego, ego ideal, id.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

A psychoanalytic term for the conscience. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
On all these registers, Treadwell's perversity is grounded in the animals he fights and fights to protect, since they hold down that "Law of Nature" and, in it, the sadistic superego with which he is identified.
The "truth of the Oedipus complex," Zizek tells us, is that it functions normally and accomplishes "its job of the child's integration into the socio-symbolic order" only when the identity of the father as Ego Ideal with that of the superego agent of prohibition "remains concealed.
Há, então, uma mudança na maneira de Jack lidar com o conflito de seu inconsciente com seu superego.
Wilbur and Warner Muensterberger (New York: International Universities Press, 1951), 192-93: "Rebellion against the totalitarian power is inhibited not only by its overwhelming might but also by the fact that part of the superego sides with the totalitarian demands.
This model might be considered in terms of the superego and the related ego ideal.
Johnson suggests updating Freud's taxonomy of id, ego, and superego (roughly parallel to the unconscious, conscious, and preconscious) with a neuroanatomical equivalent--Paul Maclean's model of the "triune brain.
Dentro do branco mora um Superego eletronico, que como todo Superego e senhor das palavras, as licitas e as proibidas, e que, fiel a sua funcao, ordena, proibe, deleta, castra.
At this stage there is also the resolution of the conflict between ideal ego/superego through the integration of the ideal ego into the superego.
54) In Freud's career, a critical agency once associated with melancholia, or the failure to assimilate loss into the ego through a form of reality-testing that confirms existence of the self and death of the other, was eventually formulated as the possession of the superego.
On the opposite end of the spectrum from West's brash Promethean scientific spirit, Hall finds the sober superego of science/ethicist Leon Kass, who happens to chair Bush's Council on Bioethics.
When a person feels guilt, she has a sense of having made a mistake; of doing something that her culture or her own superego says is wrong, or that she has failed to do something dictated by one's culture or superego.