sunstroke


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Related to sunstroke: heat exhaustion, heat stroke

sunstroke

 [sun´strōk]
a profound disturbance of the body's heat-regulating mechanism caused by prolonged exposure to excessive heat from the sun, particularly when there is little or no circulation of air. Elderly persons with underlying chronic disorders, those who use alcohol and atropine-containing drugs, and those with certain skin disorders are more susceptible. Sunstroke is a type of heat stroke, but the category heat stroke also covers disorders caused by other forms of intense heat.

Recognition. Sunstroke is not the same as heat exhaustion, a less serious disorder in which the amount of salt and fluid in the body falls below normal. In sunstroke there is a disturbance in the mechanism that controls perspiration. Since sunstroke is much more dangerous than heat exhaustion and is treated differently, it is of the utmost importance to distinguish between the two. The first symptoms of both disorders may be similar: headache, dizziness, and weakness. But later symptoms differ sharply. In heat exhaustion, there is perspiration and a normal or below normal temperature, whereas in sunstroke there is extremely high fever and absence of sweating. Sunstroke also may cause convulsions and sudden loss of consciousness. In extreme cases it may be fatal.
Treatment. In treatment of sunstroke, immediate steps must be taken to lower the body temperature, which may rise as high as 42 to 44.5°C (108 to 112°F). The patient should be placed in a shady, cool place and most of the clothing should be removed. The emergency system should be activated. Then cool water is gently applied, followed by fanning to increase heat dissipation through evaporation. Further treatment consists of measures to lower the body temperature, including ice packs, and iced drinks by mouth. Intravenous fluids are usually necessary.



Heat stroke can be prevented. Patient education should focus on protective measures such as adequate hydration and ventilation and the wearing of proper clothing. Vigorous activities should not be undertaken in extremely hot weather.

sun·stroke

(sŭn'strōk),
A form of heatstroke resulting from undue exposure to the sun's rays, probably caused by the action of actinic rays combined with high temperature; symptoms are those of heatstroke, but often without fever.

sunstroke

/sun·stroke/ (-strōk) a condition caused by excessive exposure to the sun, marked by high skin temperature, convulsions, and coma.

sunstroke

(sŭn′strōk′)
n.
Heat stroke caused by exposure to the sun and characterized by a rise in temperature, convulsions, and coma. Also called insolation, siriasis.

sunstroke

Etymology: AS, sunne + strac, stroke
a morbid condition caused by overexposure to the sun and characterized by a high temperature and altered level of consciousness. See also heat hyperpyrexia.
An outdated term that should not be used for heat intolerance conditions because these may occur in absence of sun and have been known to occur indoors—with high heat and excessive humidity

sunstroke

Sports medicine 'The outdated term “sunstroke:” should not be used for heat intolerance conditions because these conditions may occur in absence of sun and have been known to occur indoors… with high heat and excessive humidity'. See Heat intolerance.

sun·stroke

, sun stroke (sŭn'strōk)
A form of heatstroke resulting from undue exposure to the sun's rays, probably caused by the action of actinic rays combined with high temperature; symptoms are those of heatstroke, but often without fever.

sunstroke

See HEATSTROKE.

sunstroke

causing damage to the central nervous system by penetration of tissues by actinic rays is thought not to be an important physical pathogen. See also heat1 exhaustion, heat1 stroke.
References in periodicals archive ?
The people with complaints of high body temperature, altered mental state or behavior, vomiting, flushed skin, rapid breathing, racing heart rate and headache should immediately rush to the hospital for treatment as it is the sign of sunstroke.
In Kollam, a four-year-old girl, Ashney Reynold was a victim of sunstroke on Thursday when she was playing near her house.
The sunstroke leads to increase of potassium in blood that causes heart attack, he added.
Our veterinarians provide antibiotics first of all, for dehydration or sunstrokes, then multivitamins and keep them in a cool place.
Denise was badly shaken when her son Dael, eight, was hit by sunstroke after days of playing outdoors last week.
I'm not looking for sunstroke,'' said a somewhat wilted Isabel Mestler of Woodland Hills, schlepping peach-colored geraniums from Home Depot to her car.
Most Brits will miss at least one day out of seven on holiday through sunstroke, upset tummy or hangover, according to health insurer Standard Life.
A medic, who can be miles away, will now be able to diagnose and treat a soldier who is about to have sunstroke, without even physically seeing the soldier.
Store manager David Buchan said "There was a lot of concern for him but no one thought it was anything more than sunstroke or something.
OVER a thousand visitors yesterday braved sunstroke and miles of roadworks on the M6 to attend the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Centre's Open Day at Nateby, near Preston, writes Sue McMullen.
Most of the deaths have been in Andhra Pradesh state, where 1,209 people - mostly rickshaw pullers, street hawkers and the homeless - have died of sunstroke and dehydration.
With higher heat index readings, heat stroke or sunstroke become likely.