suicidal gesture


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Related to suicidal gesture: Parasuicide

gesture

 [jes´cher]
an act made or something said to signify intention or attitude.
suicidal gesture a more serious warning than a suicide threat; it may be followed by a planned suicidal act that attracts attention without seriously injuring the subject.

suicidal gesture

Any behavior or action that might be–or might have been, in the case of successful completion thereof–interpreted as indicating a person's desire or intent to commit suicide. See Cry for help.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overwhelmed by his own suicidal gesture, Ian sputters out what he has done, aghast at how he chose to do it yet felt like it was happening without him, as if fated: "it was so easy.
Here is the suicidal gesture reclaimed from the existential void.
first instance, the suicidal gesture is neither seen nor contextualized.
What is significant about the suicidal gesture here is not the
In Cache (2005) the suicidal gesture results from an enigma.
It was also found that the majority of suicidal gestures or attempts had gone untreated beyond medical management.
Among 250 consecutive admissions to a short-term residential treatment program for chemically dependent adolescents (ages 13 to 18), 50(20%) were found to have made suicidal gestures (male = 13, female = 37; mean age = 16.
He hypothesized that adolescents occasionally resort to suicidal gestures as a means of sabotaging change in some aspect of the family system.
In the group for children of substance abusers alone, four of the nine members admitted past suicidal ideation, with one having made a suicidal gesture.
Self reports are not infallible, and the Michigan and New York investigators acknowledge that some students may have considered suicidal gestures or threats to be actual attempts.
In the case of suicidal behaviors, adolescent women who had experienced sexual assault or harassment "often" were more than five times as likely to have often engaged in suicidal gestures and attempts in the previous six months.
The ambiguous nature of suicidal gestures also illustrate their counterproductiveness: they can be seen as an attempt to produce "first order change" (Watzlawick, Weakland, & Fish, 1974) - attempts which, in effect, reinforce existing constellations.