suggestive

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sug·ges·tive

(sŭg-jes'tiv),
Relating to suggestion.

suggestive

(sŭg-jes′tĭv)
1. Pert. to or stimulating suggestion.
2. Indicative. Said of certain signs, symptoms or laboratory findings that point toward, but do not completely affirm, a diagnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackie, deeply attracted to Brando, pressed her thighs suggestively into himJackie, deeply attracted to Brando, pressed her thighs suggestively into him
Such a class act deserved a high-class celebration, of course--and the suggestively named company that cooked up a culinary reputation of fried poultry parts and exploited female anatomy didn't disappoint.
Nearly as gut-busting -- but not quite -- is Borachio's execution of said plan, which involves Kennedy playing both the seducer and seducee as well as a suggestively placed rose bush.
No date or location is noted for the symposium, but a suggestively high percentage of contributors are from Singapore.
Ironically, as the differential between her sculpture and her self-portraits suggests, the process of ascribing a masculine or feminine character to suggestively arranged food is not so far removed from the way patriarchal templates tacitly order everyday life.
Yet confluences are not causalities, and at times, or so it seems to me, the parade of events are suggestively relational.
Her act hasn't changed much, with Peaches singing along to backing tapes, playing some guitar and dancing suggestively.
In the final pages of the book, Deloince-Louette suggestively applies some of her findings about Sponde the Homerist in order to enhance our appreciation of his poetry.
The conditions rather suggestively allowed cantilevering over it with a clearance of five metres, but it was forbidden to close the road or to interfere with the services beneath it.
As well, Zuckert suggestively argues that Locke's "understanding of politics has more in common with medieval constitutionalism, his understanding of morality echoes any number of earlier positions, including Stoicism, [and] his understanding of religion shares much with Protestantism contemporary with him.
THIS photograph of an inviting blue swimming pool, with two sun loungers suggestively empty at the side is one of the easiest to view of Guy Bourdin's photos.
We know this, incidentally, courtesy of another set of researchers at Kaiser, folks who work in the foundation's Suggestively named "Reproductive and Sexual Health" program.