sudden death


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sud·den death

Avoid the nonsense phrase recurrent sudden death.
death occurring rapidly and generally unexpectedly; usually from a cardiac dysrhythmia or myocardial infarction, but also from any cause of rapid death, for example, pulmonary embolus, stroke, ruptured aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection.

sudden death

Etymology: ME, sodain, to come up; AS, death
death that occurs unexpectedly and from 1 to 24 hours after the onset of symptoms, with or without known preexisting conditions.

sudden death

Forensic medicine Precipitous demise, most commonly due to cardiovascular disease Etiology Ischemia, arrhythmia, shock, aortic dissection, CHF, accompanied by hypoxia, polycystic disease of heart, familial endocardial fibroelastosis, Kawasaki's disease, anaphylaxis, 'cafe coronary,' carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide, nicotine, organophosphate pesticides, gastric rupture due to Mallory-Weiss syndrome, ulcers, septicemia, obstruction, bezoars, cerebrovascular lesions; SD is more common in alcoholics, smokers, nulliparous ♀, Pts with major psychiatric disease Most common autopsy finding Pulmonary edema. See Atrial fibrillation, Cafe coronary. Cf Sudden unexplained nocturnal death.

sud·den death

(sŭd'ĕn deth)
1. An arrhythmogenic death in aortic stenosis, coronary disease, mesothelioma of the atrioventricular node, or single coronary artery.
2. Unexpected death occurring within 1 hour of onset of symptoms; most often used to describe death caused by cardiac failure.
See also: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

sudden death

in sport, refers to sudden cardiovascular death, defined under the IOC Lausanne recommendations as death occurring without prior symptoms, or within 1 h of symptoms, in a person without a previously recognized cardiovascular condition. This specifically excludes cerebrovascular, respiratory, traumatic and drug-related causes. Ninety percent of non-traumatic sudden death in athletes is related to a pre-existing cardiac abnormality. See also aortic valve stenosis, electrocardiography (ECG), heart attack, heart murmur, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), medical screening, myocarditis, Wolff- Par kinson-White (WPW) syndrome.

sud·den death

(sŭd'ĕn deth)
Death occurring rapidly and generally unexpectedly.

sudden death

a category of illness in which animals which are under frequent observation die either with no obvious illness or after a period of illness lasting only a few hours. Typical causes are spontaneous internal hemorrhage, trauma causing shock or blood loss, rupture of the gut, cardiac tamponade, trauma to brain or spinal cord at the occipitoatlantal joint, intravenous injection of inappropriate solution or given too rapidly causing cardiac arrest or pulmonary edema, anaphylactic shock.
In large animals, group deaths can be due to electrocution, lightning injury, many poisons especially cyanide, algal fast death factor, so-called Wimmera ryegrass poisoning, fluoroacetate and oleander. Monensin causes acute heart failure in horses. Septicemia due to anthrax, toxemia due to Clostridium perfringens type D and colibacillosis can cause peracute deaths but signs are evident in animals kept under surveillance.
In feedlot cattle, sudden death may occur following the acclimatization phase of feeding and presents as death without premonitory signs of illness or agonal struggling. The cause is unknown. Postmortem examination shows no evidence of the common diseases that cause rapid death in feedlot cattle.
In chickens, a syndrome of sudden death is recognized in broiler chickens, predominantly males. The cause is unknown, but possibly metabolic as it can be induced by lactic acidosis. Called also flipover as most birds are found lying on their back.
Animals that are 'found dead' are in a different category to sudden death and have a much wider range of possible causes.

sudden death factors
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first academic report of sudden deaths among physicians.
Similar genetic variations in structural proteins in dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia also predispose individuals to an elevated risk of sudden death due to reentrant ventricular tachyarrhyhmias (2).
In a multivariate analysis that controlled for age, gender, smoking, alcohol abuse, concomitant medications, cardiovascular disease, arrhythmia, hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, and hypercholesterolemia, people who died from sudden death were 2.
The remaining 383 received it for primary prophylaxis because they had a family history of premature cardiac-related sudden death, massive left ventricular hypertrophy, ventricular tachycardia on ambulatory Holter monitoring, and/or unexplained syncope.
Sales of the controlled-release amphetamine mixed with salts, distributed by Shire Pharmaceuticals Group PLC, had been suspended earlier this year in Canada after the release of postmarketing reports of sudden death in 12 children in the United States who had taken the drug between 1999 and 2003.
After adjustment for all the standard cardiovascular risk factors, sagittal abdominal diameter--a measure of abdominal fat--was significantly associated with increased risk of sudden death.
When the roots die, the upper tree and limbs die from lack of water (see Sudden Death Looms for Oaks, American Forests, Summer 2001).
An article in the September 9, 2004 New England Journal of Medicine reported that patients using the antibiotic erythromycin at the same time as drugs that strongly inhibited cytochrome P-450 3A (CYP3A, an enzyme in the liver that helps remove many drugs from the body) had an increased risk of sudden death from cardiac (heart) causes.
To be sure, sudden death from cardiac causes occurs with unusually high frequency during or shortly after vigorous physical exertion.
As a result, sudden death has become one of the nation's major public health problems.
While there were about 40 cases of sudden death in newborn babies every year at the start of the 1990s, the number had fallen to 13 cases in 2002.
In a study published in the November 1, 2003, issue of Lancet, investigators provide some important clues into the heart problems that might be linked to sudden death and what doctors can do to help identify those at risk.