sudden deafness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

sudden deafness

a profound sensory hearing loss that develops in 24 hours or less; generally thought to be due to a viral infection in the inner ear.
See also: idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing impairment.

sudden deafness

Audiology An abrupt hearing loss that follows a known cause of deafness–eg, an explosion, viral infection, or use of certain drugs

sud·den deaf·ness

(sŭd'ĕn def'nĕs)
A profound sensory hearing loss that develops in 24 hours or less; generally thought to be due to a viral infection in the inner ear.

sudden deafness

Deafness that occurs after an acute insult to the ear, e.g., after exposure to a toxin or medication (as from too high a dose of aminoglycosides), after a viral infection that damages the inner ear, or after blasts or head trauma.
See also: deafness
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of methylprednisolone sodium succinate for injection (postotic injection) on the auditory threshold and speech recognition rate of sudden deafness patients.
Guideline of diagnosis and treatment of sudden deafness (2015) (in Chinese).
Vestibular schwannoma presenting as sudden deafness.
A clinical study of microcirculatory disturbance in Chinese patients with sudden deafness.
2010) Fate of sudden deafness occurring in the only hearing ear: outcomes and timing to consider cochlear implantation.
Most studies have found no seasonal, geographic, ethnic, racial, or sex predilection for sudden deafness.
Statistics in the literature show sudden deafness, tinnitus, inner ear damage, and Meniere disease to be predominant in the left ear (10 to 20%).
The latter finding is consistent with earlier reports that vertigo is associated with a negative prognosis in patients with hydropic hearing impairment (32) and sudden deafness.
4) Support exists for each of these explanations, but the most popular theory is that sudden deafness is caused by a disturbance of the cochlear blood flow.
Even though the etiology of sudden hypoacusis is unknown, the therapeutic approach to it is substantially the same as that taken for patients for whom a cause of sudden deafness can be traced.
Among the 105 patients with ipsilateral DEH, the presumed causes of hearing loss were otitis media and mastoiditis in 21 cases, sudden deafness in 12, mumps and viral labyrinthitis in 10, head injury in 10, high fever in three, acoustic trauma in three, drug intoxication in two, and anaphylactic shock in one case (table 1).