succimer

succimer

 [suk´sĭmer]
a chelating agent that is an analogue of dimercaprol, administered orally in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. A complex with technetium 99m is used in renal function testing.

succimer

/suc·ci·mer/ (suk´sĭ-mer) a heavy metal–chelating agent that is an analogue of dimercaprol, used in the treatment of lead poisoning; also complexed with technetium Tc 99m and used in renal function testing.

succimer

A water-soluble chelator administered per os for heavy metal poisoning–eg, lead poisoning in children > 2.17 µmol/L–US: 45 µg/dl or adults with lead poisoning due to gunshot wounds. See Lead, Saturnine gout.

Succimer (Chemet)

A drug used to remove excess lead from the body.
Mentioned in: Lead Poisoning
References in periodicals archive ?
Cadmium induced testicular damage and its response to administration of succimer and diphenyl diselenide in mice.
There are six agents available to treat heavy metal (arsenic, gold, iron, lead, and mercury) intoxication: de-ferasirox (iron), deferoxamine (iron), dimercaprol (arsenic, gold, lead, and mercury), edetate calcium disodium (lead), penicillamine (copper and mercury), and succimer (lead).
Effect of succimer chelation therapy on postural balance and gait outcomes in children with early exposure to environmental lead.
Succimer chelation improves learning, attention, and arousal regulation in lead-exposed rats but produces lasting cognitive impairment in the absence of lead exposure.
A comparison of sodium calcium edentate (edentate calcium disodium) and succimer (DMSA) in the treatment of organic lead poisoning.
Some families have turned to succimer as an alternative therapy for treating autism.
He was chelated with succimer (dimercaptosuccinic acid, or DMSA), but chelation was discontinued because of an adverse dermatologic response.
Medications such as Succimer have been shown to significantly reduce lead in children with very high blood lead levels, that is between 20 to 44 [micro]g/dL (5).
It consisted of a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of up to three courses of treatment with succimer (a lead chelating agent) and required frequent visits over a period of three years.
In addition to assessing whether such benefits are, in fact, derived from the drug, we are also interested in knowing if succimer could cause any adverse affects, particularly at a time when the brain is still developing and is, therefore, especially vulnerable to various drugs.