subtherapeutic


Also found in: Dictionary.

subtherapeutic

(sŭb′thĕr-ə-pyo͞o′tĭk)
adj.
Below the dosage levels used to treat diseases: subtherapeutic feeding of penicillin to livestock.

sub′ther·a·peu′ti·cal·ly adv.

subtherapeutic

(sŭb″thĕr-ŭ-pūt′ĭk) [″ + ″]
1. Less than adequately treated.
2. Taking a drug with a blood level below a desired treatment range. Patients using warfarin for atrial fibrillation, for example, have subtherapeutic anticoagulation when their international normalized ratio (INR) is below 2.0.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 144 patients (61%) had subtherapeutic INR levels (<2.
These results show that even in the presence of subtherapeutic lepirudin concentrations the dPT ratio exceeds the cutoff value.
For over 30 years, the agency has been confronted with evidence of the human health risks associated with the widespread subtherapeutic use of antibiotics in food-producing animals, and, despite a statutory mandate to ensure the safety of animal drugs, the agency has done shockingly little to address these risks," (http://docs.
Even given the short duration of the surgical procedures in our study, the majority of our patients receiving preoperative oral paracetamol had subtherapeutic levels by the time they reached the recovery room.
If dose proportionality exists, lower doses and longer intervals likely produce subtherapeutic concentrations to treat systemic infections.
If cortisone levels still remain low and the patient does not have Addison's disease, then a subtherapeutic dose of Cortef may also be beneficial.
When prescribing antibiotics, one must also be wary of inappropriate use, which falls into two categories: incorrect diagnosis and subtherapeutic dosing.
The doses of IGF-1 in PRP are subtherapeutic in terms of producing systemic anabolic actions by a factor of 500 (300 ng versus 160 [micro]g) (Creaney and Hamilton, 2008).
1-3,7,8) Subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics are used in animals for promoting growth or preventing diseases.
Soon, this became a worldwide practice, and in addition to the antibiotics used in farm animals for therapeutic purposes, to treat infections, large amounts of antibiotics started to be used as growth promoters at subtherapeutic concentrations (van den Bogaard et al.
Public health concerns relative to the use of subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics in animal feed.
regulatory action to the record of the European chicken market following the European Union's unilateral abolition of subtherapeutic antibiotics used in chicken production in 1999.