substrate

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substrate

 [sub´strāt]
1. any substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

sub·strate (S),

(sŭb'strāt),
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (for example, the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

/sub·strate/ (sub´strāt)
1. a substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

substrate

(sŭb′strāt′)
n.
1. The material or substance on which an enzyme acts.
2. Biology A surface on which an organism grows or is attached.
3. An underlying layer; a substratum.

substrate

[sub′strāt]
Etymology: L, sub + stratum, layer
a chemical acted on and changed by an enzyme in a chemical reaction.

substrate

Psychiatry The mental and/or emotional basis on which a particular response occurs. See Suicide substrate.

sub·strate

(S) (sŭb'strāt)
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. The base on which an organism lives or grows, e.g., the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture.
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

The substance on which an ENZYME acts. Any reactant in a reaction that is catalyzed by an enzyme.

substrate

  1. the medium on which an organism (especially a microorganism) can grow.
  2. the solid object to which a plant is attached, such as a rock forming the substrate for a seaweed STIPE.
  3. any substance on which an enzyme can act.

substrate

substance acted on/changed by enzyme action

sub·strate

(sŭb'strāt)
1. Substance acted on and changed by an enzyme.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (e.g., substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

any substance upon which an enzyme acts.

substrate binding site
part of the active site of an enzyme which includes the amino acid residues that come into contact with the substrate.
substrate specificity
range of substrates that can be catalytically converted to product by an enzyme.
suicide substrate
References in periodicals archive ?
The Global SiC Substrates Industry Report 2015 is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the SiC substrates industry.
Intel's shift from ceramic to laminate substrates provided a major growth driver to develop the infrastructure for organic substrates by creating high-volume demand for laminate substrates for PC microprocessors: the first packages with pin grid arrays (PGA) with pins instead of pads on the package.
To maximize adhesion on metal substrates, surface preparation is vitally important.
Replacing active packages with bare die reduces the required footprint for that particular function as much as sevenfold, and significantly reduces pad size and pitch on the substrate necessary to accept the bare die bumps.
Until now, studies involving non-composted substrates have focused on the refinement of substrate formulations for increased yield and bioefficiency.
This allows deposition of harder alloys into softer metal substrates such as beryllium-copper without distortion of the tool dimensions or grain structure.
It is also effective in cleaning substrates other than organic electroluminescent LCD substrates and planarizing color filters.
AIST developed a "pressure annealing" technique to reduce the resistance of conducting circuits formed on plastic film substrates by printing, without high temperature baking.
Parylene can be applied to many substrates, including glass, metal, resin, plastics, ceramic, ferrite and silicon, and even powdered and granular substances.
These challenges include providing low-solubility chlorinated substrates (e.
Six specimens of 7 % mass fraction yttria-stabilized zirconia coating produced by EB-PVD on nickel-based superalloy substrates have been measured for thermal conductivity.
Even so, it proved possible in the 1970s to breed white leghorns free of endogenous ALV genomes; such chickens are now being introduced by Merck as preferred substrates for vaccine production.