substance abuse


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Related to substance abuse: drug abuse

abuse

 [ah-būs´]
misuse, maltreatment, or excessive use.
child abuse see child abuse.
domestic abuse abuse of a person by another person with whom the victim is living, has lived, or with whom a significant relationship exists. The abuse may take the form of verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical battering, or psychological (emotional) unavailability. Abuse is a learned behavior and has an escalating cycle; abusive behavior cuts across all racial, ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic boundaries.
drug abuse see drug abuse.
elder abuse maltreatment of an older adult, ranging from passive neglect of needs to overt mental, physical, or sexual assault.
physical abuse any act resulting in a nonaccidental physical injury, including not only intentional assault but also the results of unreasonable punishment.
psychoactive substance abuse substance abuse.
sexual abuse any act of a sexual nature performed in a criminal manner, as with a child or with a nonconsenting adult, including rape, incest, oral copulation, and penetration of genital or anal opening with a foreign object. The term also includes lewd or lascivious acts with a child; any sexual act that could be expected to trouble or offend another person when done by someone motivated by sexual interest; acts related to sexual exploitation, such as those related to pornography, prostitution involving minors, or coercion of minors to perform obscene acts.
substance abuse a substance use disorder characterized by the use of a mood or behavior-altering substance in a maladaptive pattern resulting in significant impairment or distress, such as failure to fulfill social or occupational obligations or recurrent use in situations in which it is physically dangerous to do so or which end in legal problems, but without fulfilling the criteria for substance dependence. Specific disorders are named for their etiology, such as alcohol abuse and anabolic steroid abuse. DSM-IV includes specific abuse disorders for alcohol, amphetamines or similar substances, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants, opioids, PCP or similar substances, and sedatives, hypnotics, or anxiolytics. See also drug abuse.

sub·stance a·buse

maladaptive pattern of use of a drug, alcohol, or other chemical agent that may lead to social, occupational, psychological, or physical problems.

substance abuse

n.
Excessive, inappropriate, or illegal use of a substance, such as a drug, alcohol, or another chemical such as an inhalant, especially when resulting in addiction. Also called chemical abuse.

substance abuser n.

substance abuse

the overindulgence in and dependence on a stimulant, depressant, or other chemical substance, leading to effects that are detrimental to the individual's physical or mental health, or the welfare of others.

drug abuse

The widely preferred term for the non-medicinal (“recreational”) use of controlled drugs; in the NHS, the phrase “substance misuse” is preferred.

substance abuse

Drug addiction Psychiatry Use of any substance for nontherapeutic purposes; or use of medication for purposes other than those for which it is prescribed; SA includes:
1. Use of illicit, potentially addicting drugs–eg, cocaine;.
2. Misuse of prescribed drugs that stimulate or depress the CNS–eg, amphetamines or barbiturates;.
3. Habitual use of commercially-available substances with known desired and deleterious effects–eg, alcohol, tobacco. See Addiction, Alcohol, Cocaine, Crack, Ice, Marijuana.

sub·stance a·buse

(sŭb'stăns ă-byūs')
Maladaptive pattern of drug or alcohol use that may lead to social, occupational, psychological, or physical problems.

substance abuse

A general term referring to the non-medical and ‘recreational’ use of drugs such as amphetamine (amfetamine), cannabis, cocaine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), organic solvents by inhalation, and so on. The term is also applied to an intake of alcohol that is likely to prove harmful. Oddly enough is not currently applied to a commonly-used substance more dangerous than most of these-tobacco.

substance abuse,

n misuse of mood-altering drugs; negatively influences the user's life.

sub·stance a·buse

(sŭb'stăns ă-byūs')
Maladaptive pattern of drug or alcohol use that may lead to social, occupational, psychological, or physical problems.

Patient discussion about substance abuse

Q. Can anybody tell me the point where I should be worried that I've become an alcoholoic? What is the definition of an alcoholist?

A. You truly have a great site here. Its got a lot of potential and can surely help many.

More discussions about substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
4) There should be multiple stakeholders involved in the creation of programs to eliminate substance abuse.
The reorganization, which was announced by executive order of the governor, left mental health officials largely in place, placing the brunt of changes on the substance abuse treatment officials.
People with substance abuse issues can benefit from support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous.
The extant literature lacks studies that explored the direct relationship between substance abuse CSE and continuing education.
State drug courts vary from one jurisdiction to another in terms of structure, scope, and target populations, but they all have three primary goals: (1) reduce recidivism among participants, (2) reduce substance abuse among participants, and (3) rehabilitate participants to improve their chances of successful reintegration into society by providing social services such as employment, job training, education, and housing assistance.
In addition, the number of substance abuse treatment admissions by the peer volunteers demonstrated that the program could pay for itself.
A 38-item survey was used to obtain information about high school psychologists' perceived competence and training needs for working with students with substance abuse problems.
Social work education is not the only source of substance abuse knowledge for professional social workers.
Meth is seductive,'' said Jamie Wilder, program manager for the Alternative Substance Abuse Program.
A review of 144 highly regarded substance abuse programs for adolescents revealed some disturbing deficiencies in standardized care.
The impact of substance abuse on society is wide ranging and costly.
Educators may attribute adolescent mood swings and behavior changes to hormones or stress, but sometimes the problem is substance abuse.

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