subsidence

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sub·si·dence

(sŭb-sī'dĕns),
Sinking or settling in bone, as of a prosthetic component of a total joint implant.

sub·si·dence

(sŭb'si-dĕns)
Sinking or settling in bone, as of a prosthetic component of a total joint implant.

subsidence

(sŭb-sīd′ĕns) [L. subsidere, to sink down]
The gradual disappearance of symptoms or manifestations of a disease.

Patient discussion about subsidence

Q. when dirarear subsides what can i eat,its been 14 hrs since last visit to toilet

A. try dry toast.

More discussions about subsidence
References in classic literature ?
In the nature of a warm-hearted woman, this was only the inevitable reaction which followed the subsidence of anxiety about the girl, after her own resolution had set that anxiety at rest.
When converted by subsidence into large separate islands, there will still exist many individuals of the same species on each island: intercrossing on the confines of the range of each species will thus be checked: after physical changes of any kind, immigration will be prevented, so that new places in the polity of each island will have to be filled up by modifications of the old inhabitants; and time will be allowed for the varieties in each to become well modified and perfected.
The beds including the above fossil remains, stand only from fifteen to twenty feet above the level of high-water; and hence the elevation of the land has been small (without there has been an intercalated period of subsidence, of which we have no evidence) since the great quadrupeds wandered over the surrounding plains; and the external features of the country must then have been very nearly the same as now.
When this bar is gradually increased by storms, tides, or currents, or there is a subsidence of the waters, so that it reaches to the surface, that which was at first but an inclination in the shore in which a thought was harbored becomes an individual lake, cut off from the ocean, wherein the thought secures its own conditions -- changes, perhaps, from salt to fresh, becomes a sweet sea, dead sea, or a marsh.
And he himself sank with so earth-shaking a subsidence that he broke a big rose-tree with his body and shook up into the sky a cloud of red earth--like the smoke of some heathen sacrifice.
These surface subsidences form pits and bowl to trough shaped depressions (typically no more than 500 feet wide and three feet deep for the bowl-shaped depressions or for sinkholes or pits up to about 30 feet wide and 10 feet deep).