suboptimal


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sub·op·ti·mal

(sŭb-op'ti-măl),
Below or less than the optimum.

suboptimal

(sŭb-ŏp′tĭ-măl) [″ + optimus, best]
Less than optimum.

sub·op·ti·mal

(sŭb-op'ti-măl)
Below or less than the optimum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The suboptimal government health investment and highout of pocket expenditure no doubt contribute significantly to poor health indices in the country.
3) It is shown that, for each detector, the proposed suboptimal resource allocation algorithms can achieve a close performance to the optimal algorithm and perform better than the conventional algorithms.
However, suboptimal testing practices such as delayed reporting of test results, false negatives and sample management issues mean that patients and pharmaceutical companies are missing out.
Regular consumption of a high-phytate diet reduces the inhibitory effect of phytate on nonheme-iron absorption in women with suboptimal iron stores.
Risk factors and morbidity associated with suboptimal instrument placement at instrumental delivery: observational study nested within the Instrumental Delivery & Ultrasound randomised controlled trial ISRCTN 72230496.
Suboptimal Choice by Pigeons: Value of the Conditioned Reinforcer Determines Choice not the Frequency of Reinforcement
Out of 200 paired slides stained by PAP and REAP, PAP showed 2 cases of suboptimal cytoplasmic and nuclear staining whereas REAP showed 6 cases of suboptimal cytoplasmic staining and 4 cases of suboptimal nuclear staining.
Plastic and reconstructive surgeons from the US, Canada, and Europe contribute 49 chapters on repairing postoperative complications or suboptimal aesthetic outcomes related to cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery.
In the multivariate analysis, significantly fewer patients in the IMRT arm had suboptimal overall cosmesis (odds ratio, 065; 95% confidence interval, 0.
Minority children and those in suboptimal health, along with children who had parents with lower educational levels or lower household income, were more likely to be enrolled in Medicaid during all 5 years, the study found.
The report looked at six areas that contribute to unnecessary costs: medication nonadherence, delayed evidence-based treatment practice, misuse of antibiotics, medication errors, suboptimal use of generics, and mismanaged polypharmacy in older adults.
Excessively increasing the workload may lead to suboptimal care and less direct patient care time, which may paradoxically increase, rather than decrease, costs," the authors wrote.