sublation

(redirected from sublate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn),
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]

sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn)
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]

sublation

(sub-la'shun) [L. sublatio, elevation]
The displacement, elevation, or removal of a part. Synonym: sublatio
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, while untimeliness is an ontological a priori, Derrida is concerned that too often theorists and practitioners attempt to marginalize and/or sublate untimeliness because it points to the contingency of privileged ways of ordering reality including systems, structures, rules, roles, codes, etc.
However, Leporello fails to sublate this sensuality in his catalogue and becomes overwhelmed by his master's erotic presence, whose power resonates in Mozart's music.
His textual prototype is "Michael," which "completes and reflexively sublates (in the Hegelian sense) the project of Lyrical Ballads" (192).
In discussing performative documentary, Nichols insists on the centrality of "(t)he ethnopoetics of Jean Rouch, who has consistently argued for, and embodied, a style of filmmaking that does not so much as combine the subjective and objective poles of traditional ethnography as sublate them into a distinct form.
The gendering of a feminine matter and masculine form in philosophical discourse underwrites the practice of allegory, which must find a way to sublate matter into form.
Whereas Benn had his "Ligurian complex" to sublate the cynicism of analytic intelligence into poetry, Grunbein's analytic poems, without such moments, become, however forcefully, prosaic, dominated by the ideas for which they serve as vehicle.
does not relieve or otherwise sublate the burden of |history's~ material stuff.
Given the international structure of the ecological crisis and economic and social inequality, especially important is the need to combine or sublate ecology with issues of economic and social justice.
For Hegel, the distinction between life and nonlife is arguably more important than any other distinction, since organic existence is the point at which the inorganic world reaches such a complex level of self-organization as to sublate itself and turn into spirit.
Precisely to sustain this extraordinary paradox of the aesthetic experience--namely, that art offers one last instantiation of mythical experience in order to sublate myth once and for all and thereby to emancipate art's spectators from myth's reign--was the very ambition of the anti-aesthetic from the beginning.
This happens in art through Hegelian mediation between the subject and object; but such mediation, unlike in Hegel, does not sublate into higher synthesis-there remains something residual in the object that resists mediation, to which only mimesis (myth) can attend.