subarachnoid haemorrhage

(redirected from subarachnoid haematoma)

subarachnoid haemorrhage

A severe intracerebral haemorrhage in the subarachnoid space, often due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm.
 
Clinical
Abrupt severe headache, loss of consciousness, vomiting.
 
Aetiology
Ruptured cerebral aneurysm, AV malformation, traumatic cerebral arterial dissection, extension of an intracerebral haemorrhage into the subarachnoid space, idiopathic.
 
Risk factors
Aneurysms, polycystic kidney disease, fibromuscular dysplasia, hypertension.
 
Management
Ventilation, oxygenation, fluid, tissue dehydration (e.g., mannitol, surgical evacuation), bed rest, sedation, analgesia, anti-seizure drugs.

sub·a·rach·noid hem·or·rhage

(sŭb'ă-rak'noyd hem'ŏr-ăj)
Bleeding between the middle membrane covering of the brain and the brain itself; 5-10% of strokes are caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage. Most common in people 20-60 years old; female predilection.
Synonym(s): subarachnoid bleed, subarachnoid haemorrhage.

subarachnoid haemorrhage

Bleeding over and into the substance of the brain from a ruptured artery lying under the arachnoid layer of the MENINGES. The commonest cause is rupture of a pre-existing berry-like swelling (ANEURYSM) on one of the arteries or bleeding from a tumour-like malformation on an artery. Subarachnoid haemorrhage is the main cause of spontaneous STROKE in young people. There is a sudden severe headache followed by loss of consciousness or other signs of neurological damage. The death rate is high. Treatment is directed to keeping the blood pressure reasonably low, preventing blood vessels from going into spasm and preventing blood clot in an aneurysm from dissolving. Surgery is sometimes appropriate.

sub·a·rach·noid hem·or·rhage

(sŭb'ă-rak'noyd hem'ŏr-ăj)
Extravasation of blood into subarachnoid space.
Synonym(s): subarachnoid haemmorhage.