style


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sty·let

, stylette (stī'let, stī-let'),
1. A flexible metallic rod inserted in the lumen of a flexible catheter to stiffen it and give it form during its passage.
2. A slender probe.
Synonym(s): style, stylus (3) , stilus
[It. stilletto, a dagger; dim. of L. stilus or stylus, a stake, a pen]

style

the stalk of the PISTIL of a flower connecting the STIGMA to the ovary.

style

a term used in subjective appraisal of wool; combines brightness, density, character, dust penetration and tip shape.
References in classic literature ?
You mean, I said, if I understand you aright, that there is one sort of narrative style which may be employed by a truly good man when he has anything to say, and that another sort will be used by a man of an opposite character and education.
Then he will adopt a mode of narration such as we have illustrated out of Homer, that is to say, his style will be both imitative and narrative; but there will be very little of the former, and a great deal of the latter.
And you would agree with me in saying that one of them is simple and has but slight changes; and if the harmony and rhythm are also chosen for their simplicity, the result is that the speaker, if hc speaks correctly, is always pretty much the same in style, and he will keep within the limits of a single harmony (for the changes are not great), and in like manner he will make use of nearly the same rhythm?
Whereas the other requires all sorts of harmonies and all sorts of rhythms, if the music and the style are to correspond, because the style has all sorts of changes.
Yes, I said, Adeimantus, but the mixed style is also very charming: and indeed the pantomimic, which is the opposite of the one chosen by you, is the most popular style with children and their attendants, and with the world in general.
But I suppose you would argue that such a style is unsuitable to our State, in which human nature is not twofold or manifold, for one man plays one part only?
And do not the two styles, or the mixture of the two, comprehend all poetry, and every form of expression in words?
As a boy, though, I had often stayed at Styles, his mother's place in Essex.
We had a good yarn about old times, and it ended in his inviting me down to Styles to spend my leave there.
Their country-place, Styles Court, had been purchased by Mr.
He had married two years ago, and had taken his wife to live at Styles, though I entertained a shrewd suspicion that he would have preferred his mother to increase his allowance, which would have enabled him to have a home of his own.
Thus it came about that, three days later, I descended from the train at Styles St.