stutter


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stut·ter

(stŭt'ĕr),
To speak dysfluently; to enunciate certain words with difficulty and with frequent halting and repetition of the initial consonant of a word or syllable.
[frequentative of stut, from Goth. stautan, to strike]

stutter

(stŭt′ər)
intr. & tr.v. stut·tered, stut·tering, stut·ters
To speak or utter with a spasmodic repetition or prolongation of sounds.
n.
The act or habit of stuttering.

stut′ter·er n.
stut′ter·ing·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though Cervantes creates a character that also stutters and he himself writes that he is a stutterer, the way that I came to believe that Cervantes was a stutterer was based on an intuition rather than something I read.
Separated from the main sentence by dashes (two of twenty-one in this noticeably brief and choppy preface), the mention of her stutter is visually, logically, and biographically out of place.
According to Starkweather, the result of such an approach to stuttering treatment would lead persons who stutter to "redefine themselves and their disorder" and to "discover new ways of thinking about stuttering and social interaction" (p.
In a recent summary of his work, Webster (2004), however, outlined his research program summarizing that although the lateralization of the left hemisphere is normal for people who stutter, the left hemisphere may be more susceptible, vulnerable, or fragile when increased right-hemisphere activation competes with or interferes with the left hemisphere.
Mr Stutter said: "We would talk and, on one occasion, we both agreed that his thoughts could form the basis of a book.
When compared with normal controls, children who stutter had reduced white-matter integrity only in the left arcuate fasciculus (a tract that underlies the oral-facial motor regions).
Upon stuttering or upon anticipation of a stutter, the client is told to stop speaking and engage in diaphragmatic breathing while consciously relaxing chest and throat muscles, to think about what needs to be said, and to start speaking following a small exhale.
We do know that more men than women stutter and that there is a 20 per cent greater chance of stuttering if a close relative has a speech problem.
In her early years, silenced by a stutter that left her able to link only three or four words at once, Wilcox expressed herself by drawing.
However, 1 percent of adults and 3 percent of children in the world who stutter cannot take fluency of speech for granted (Bloodstein, 1993).
Besides, there is a huge stigma attached to it, which is why it is going to be a massive challenge putting the survey together," said Farah who has been running a support group, Stutter UAE, for four years.
But he has now almost entirely overcome his stutter through therapy - and is training to be an actor.