stump pain

stump pain

pain arising in the stump in a person with an amputated limb. Unlike phantom limb pain, which originates and ends in the brain, it originates from damaged nerves near the site of the amputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
g post herpetic neuralgia (PHN), trigeminal neuralgia, post diabetic neuralgia (PDN), post traumatic neuralgia (PTN), scar pain, nerve entrapment syndromes, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I, II), stump pain, etc.
Acute stump pain and phantom limb pain after amputation is a significant problem among amputees with a reported incidence of 13%-71%.
sup][1] Potential reported benefits include reduced post-amputation stump pain, [sup][2] chronic radicular pain, [sup][3],[4],[5] certain neuropathic pain conditions, [sup][6],[7],[8] and shoulder arthropathic pain.
Pulsed radiofrequency of lumbar dorsal root ganglia for chronic post-amputation stump pain.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults.
Up to 80% of amputees experience phantom pain following amputation and 5 to 10% experience persistent stump pain (1,2,14).
Taleisnik reviewed 23 patients of whom nine reported distal ulnar stump pain and two required reoperation.
Residual limb pain, or stump pain, involves painful sensations at the site of the amputation (Hill, 1999).
The plaintiff also suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain disorder, depression, low self-esteem, phantom pain, stump pain, neuropsychological and emotional problems, short term memory problems, sleep disturbances, and permanent brain damage due to his heavy loss of blood of nine pints after the accident.
However, as a result of the very encouraging results of a Phase IIa study in amputated limb stump pain with a novel topical medication from SantoSolve, the company has just initiated recruitment in a 3 month multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III study in 150 patients suffering moderateto- severe residual limb pain following amputation.
Transcutaneous electricalnerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults.
In addition, they are careful to separate these perceptions from stump pain.