structure


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structure

 [struk´cher]
the components and their manner of arrangement in constituting a whole.
family structure the way in which a family is organized according to roles, rules, power, and hierarchies.

struc·ture

(strŭk'chūr),
1. The arrangement of the details of a part; the manner of formation of a part.
2. A tissue or formation made up of different but related parts.
3. chemistry the specific connections of the atoms in a given molecule.
Synonym(s): structura
[L. structura, fr. struo, pp. structus, to build]

structure

(strŭk′chər)
n.
Biology
a. The arrangement or formation of the tissues, organs, or other parts of an organism.
b. An organ or other part of an organism.

structure

[struk′chər]
Etymology: L, structura
a part of the body, such as the heart, a bone, a gland, a cell, or a limb.

structure

Vox populi The appearance of a thing. See Age structure, Bile duct structure, Cloverleaf structure, Pharyngeal structure, Sleep structure, Wolffian duct structure.

struc·ture

(strŭk'shŭr)
1. The arrangement of the details of a part; the manner of formation of a part.
2. A tissue or formation made up of different but related parts.
3. chemistry The configuration and interconnections of the atoms in a given molecule.
Synonym(s): structura.
[L. structura, fr. struo, pp. structus, to build]

struc·ture

(strŭk'shŭr)
1. Arrangement of the details of a part; the manner of formation of a part.
2. A tissue or formation made up of different but related parts.
3. In chemistry, the specific connections of the atoms in a given molecule.
[L. structura, fr. struo, pp. structus, to build]

structure,

n the architectural arrangement of the component parts of a tissue, part, organ, or body. Also the individual components of the body.
structure, border,
structure, cored,
n in metallurgy a grain structure with composition gradients resulting from the progressive freezing of the components in different proportions. Nonmetals used in dentistry (e.g., zinc phosphate, silicate cements) also are cored structures, in that they have a nucleus of undissolved powder particles surrounded by a matrix of reacted material.
structure, denture-supporting,
n the tissues, including teeth and residual ridges, that serve as the foundation or basal seat for removable partial dentures.
structure, functional form of supporting,
n the state of denture-supporting structures when they have been placed in such a position as to be able to begin resisting occlusal forces.
structure, histologic,
n the microscopic structure of organic tissues.
structure, radiolucent,
n the structures or substances that permit the penetration of x-radiation and are thus registered as relatively dark areas on the radiograph.
structure, radiopaque
n structures of such density that roentgen rays cannot penetrate them, causing them to appear as light areas on the radiograph.
structure, supporting,
n the tissues that maintain or assist in maintaining the teeth in position in the alveolus (e.g., gingivae, cementum of the tooth, periodontal ligament, alveolar and trabecular bone).
References in classic literature ?
In the structure of the federal government, no regard, it is said, seems to have been paid to this essential precaution in favor of liberty.
People who have never seen these structures, and have only the ill-imagined efforts of artists or the imperfect descriptions of such eye-witnesses as myself to go upon, scarcely realise that living quality.
The more he became interested in special questions of disease, such as the nature of fever or fevers, the more keenly he felt the need for that fundamental knowledge of structure which just at the beginning of the century had been illuminated by the brief and glorious career of Bichat, who died when he was only one-and-thirty, but, like another Alexander, left a realm large enough for many heirs.
Saintsbury admits, such lines being frequent in his favourite Dryden; yet, on the other hand, it might be maintained, and would be maintained by its French critics, that our English poetry has been too apt to dispense with those prose qualities, which, though not the indispensable qualities of poetry, go, nevertheless, to the making of all first-rate poetry--the qualities, namely, of orderly structure, and such qualities generally as depend upon second thoughts.
About fifty yards out at sea was a queer wooden structure, set up on strong supports.
The mists had rolled up more thickly than ever and the queer little structure was almost invisible.
While, therefore, an epic like the "Odyssey" is an organism and dramatic in structure, a work such as the "Theogony" is a merely artificial collocation of facts, and, at best, a pageant.
In any work of literature there should be definite structure.
Sometimes, however, the structure just indicated may not be followed; a story may begin in the middle, and the earlier part may be told later on in retrospect, or incidentally indicated, like the Antecedent Action.
It may be asked further of poetry, whether the meter and stanza structure are appropriate to the mood and thought and so handled as to bring out the emotion effectively; and whether the sound is adapted to the sense (for example, musical where the idea is of peace or quiet beauty).
It is customary to assume that, in such cases, the past operates by modifying the structure of the brain, not directly.
In the case of dead matter, however, such phenomena are less frequent and important than in the case of living organisms, and it is far less difficult to invent satisfactory hypotheses as to the microscopic changes of structure which mediate between the past occurrence and the present changed response.

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